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Museum Review: National World War 2 Museum


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sheep21 #21 Posted Apr 22 2012 - 19:44

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The_Chieftain, on Apr 22 2012 - 18:59, said:

I don't really need an excuse to go back to those places. Put it this way, I've even tried the Weymouth night life.


Weymouth?! Well, it's better than South End on Sea...

abramshunter #22 Posted Apr 22 2012 - 19:58

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Any chance we can get your review of the Canadian War Museum?

iampiper13 #23 Posted Apr 22 2012 - 22:35

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I grew up 20 miles from APG and worked on a mowing crew one summer, as a bigtime WW2 "fan" I loved being able to mow around the tanks parked at the museum and on "Tank Blvd" it kinda saddened me that they were moving a lot of it to Ft. Lee

PanzerHale #24 Posted Apr 23 2012 - 06:42

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My biggest criticism, like Chieftain pointed out, is that there are almost no references to any other country taking part in the war. The Tom Hanks documentary, as a non-American, left me feeling immensely disappointed (to paraphrase, "September 1939, Germany invades Poland... December 7, 1941 Japan attacks Pearl Harbour. Nothing important really happens in between") and the overwhelmingly patriotic jingoism of the place was too in your face when you compare it to the nuetral brilliance of IWM London, IWM Duxford, Bovington or even the Australian War Museum in Canberra.  

While there was some interesting kit in there, ultimately, I think kids going in there would come out with the impression that America won the war single handedly and not have any real sense of the depth to the conflict.
My opinion anyway.

tangojuliet #25 Posted Apr 23 2012 - 17:26

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PanzerHale, on Apr 23 2012 - 06:42, said:

My biggest criticism, like Chieftain pointed out, is that there are almost no references to any other country taking part in the war. The Tom Hanks documentary, as a non-American, left me feeling immensely disappointed (to paraphrase, "September 1939, Germany invades Poland... December 7, 1941 Japan attacks Pearl Harbour. Nothing important really happens in between") and the overwhelmingly patriotic jingoism of the place was too in your face when you compare it to the nuetral brilliance of IWM London, IWM Duxford, Bovington or even the Australian War Museum in Canberra.  

While there was some interesting kit in there, ultimately, I think kids going in there would come out with the impression that America won the war single handedly and not have any real sense of the depth to the conflict.
My opinion anyway.
yeah i know i m a civil war reenactor and when i go to civil war museums  they always focus on the union army and on Virginia and never any where else and it kinda makes you wonder what are we teaching our kids

WildBill813 #26 Posted Apr 24 2012 - 01:48

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Being from New Orleans and having been to the NWWII Museum a couple of times, I really enjoyed your review.

While I respect your and others take on it being "patriotic" and biased toward the American contributions to the war, It is the "National World War II Museum" and not just the "World War II Museum".  And while there was hardly a nation that was not somehow involved in the War, one can only imagine the outcome had the United States not become involved as was our intention before the Japanese attack on Hawaii.  (The U.S., after WWI tended to be very isolationist, and while a considerable number of Americans were volunteering to fight in Europe and Asia, they were not paid by the U.S. military.)

Glad you enjoyed your stay in New Orleans!

The_Chieftain #27 Posted Apr 24 2012 - 06:46

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I'm not so worried about it being biased in favour of US storytelling. I would defy any nation's official war museum to not be biased. (Artefact musea like Bovington or Kubinka are a little easier, as they are fairly objective: A tank is a tank, and they tend to take artefacts of all nations that they can find for the purposes of demonstrating technology).
What I'm a little more concerned with is that if a nation's government cares about educating its populace, then the nation's official museum on the subject should be ideally the best place of learning on that subject in the nation. I view the "National" in the title to represent the Congressional designation, not to enforce the museum to focus on US WWII history to the exclusion of all else. Now, if the charter from Congress says that it's supposed to be the "National Museum of American Participation in WW2", then that's not the fault of the museum, but it still begs the problem that if an American wanted to go to a museum to learn about WW2 in general, the nation's WW2 museum doesn't cover it.

Panzer4life #28 Posted Apr 24 2012 - 23:28

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Hey there Cheftan, I love reading these museum reviews and stuff that you've done. I have an idea for one you might be interested in doing, at the General Spatz airfield (now The MidAtllantic Air Museum) in Reading, Pennsylvania we have a World War II weekend. Last 3 days, and is a huge event. This year it's on June 1st until the 3rd.

There they have everything from reinactors, veterans, things on display, and even an air show and presentations. Seems like all sides were quite well covered. I myself got myself a 3 day pass this year.....being an air museum there is a little more of a concentration of aircraft (the air museum is currently trying to remodel a P61 Blackwidow, for example), but they still bring a few other cool armored vehicles, like a Stug last year, and speaking to all the historians is quite cool :)

Sadly, the rest of the year the museum is kind of dull, but the event is one of the largest of its types in this country. Here's the link to the events web page http://maam.org/maamwwii.html

Anyways, just a suggestion for you and anyone else on the U.S. east coast  :Smile_great:

The_Chieftain #29 Posted Apr 25 2012 - 00:18

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Panzer4life, on Apr 24 2012 - 23:28, said:

but they still bring a few other cool armored vehicles, like a Stug last year, and speaking to all the historians is quite cool :)

http://www.maam.org/...inson 2011 (61).jpg

I have my suspiscions... And one is a three-digit number beginning with '4'.

sheep21 #30 Posted Apr 25 2012 - 00:32

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wrong wheels on that their stug, soviet tank rebuilt is it?

I took part in the Military Odyssey in detling, UK (I am an English Civil War Reenactor), last august bank holiday, had a running T34-85 their, lovely bit of kit, got real up close all around, the build quality was awful mind, plates ill fitting, messy welds, rough casting for turret, but hey, the old girl still worked fine.
The repo Panzer III with the long 50cm was nice, personally fave was the Challenger II, doing a 180 degree powerslide in a MBT is EPIC. :Smile-izmena:

Top blokes the guys from the 2nd Royal Tank Regiment, were a great laugh!

Panzer4life #31 Posted Apr 25 2012 - 11:52

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sheep21, on Apr 25 2012 - 00:32, said:

wrong wheels on that their stug, soviet tank rebuilt is it?

Indeed, according to the guy who brought it the thing was built on another chassis.Makes sense why they did it....not sure how many privately owned working Stugs there are in this country, let alone a Panzer III to build one off of the chassis of. Din't quite recall which tank it was they used, but they did a well enough of a job to fool me until I saw the road wheels and had to ask the guy about it.

The_Chieftain #32 Posted Apr 25 2012 - 15:52

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Panzer4life, on Apr 25 2012 - 11:52, said:

Indeed, according to the guy who brought it the thing was built on another chassis. Makes sense why they did it....not sure how many privately owned working Stugs there are in this country, let alone a Panzer III to build one off of the chassis of. Din't quite recall which tank it was they used, but they did a well enough of a job to fool me until I saw the road wheels and had to ask the guy about it.

And I gave you a clue and all...

Quote

I have my suspiscions... And one is a three-digit number beginning with '4'.

It's an FV432. I'm aware of at least two privately owned StuGs in California, so it wouldn't surprise me that there's another one or two in the US somewhere.

Aesir #33 Posted Apr 25 2012 - 17:00

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If you're ever in Southern Arizona, for whatever reason, give the Pima Air & Space Museum a look. It may not be tank related, but it has a B-29 and an SR-71.




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