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Chopa #1301 Posted Aug 07 2012 - 03:18

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Don't start with the medal counting......It's not that long ago that what you list described pretty accurately the usual BRITISH total medal take at an Olympics.

   Reminds me of a story from my childhood: On an RAF base long ago and far away I was leaving for school as my dad and our next-door neighbour Col. Bill Hodges, a USAF officer on secondment to the RAF, were heading off to walk to the salt-mines. Both men were of similar ages, and career paths. I asked why Bill had so many more medal ribbons than my dad.  He replied that most of them were simple ticket punches for being there and not crashing the plane, this one for paying his mess bill on time, and that one for figuring out how to work the PX system. I guess my dad felt serious medal envy cos all he said was: "This one was for beating the Germans, and this one was for beating the Japanese."

_Freddy_ #1302 Posted Aug 07 2012 - 10:08

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View Postnicofer1985, on Aug 07 2012 - 00:51, said:

Wich result, bro?
You mean the Argentine triumph in Volley (3-0) or the in Handball (32-21)?

You obviously never read the whole conversation and did not get the irony.

An Argentine hockey player 'Fernando Zylberberg' stared in a certain advert with the inflammatory line "To compete on English soil we train on Argentine soil." (incidently desecrating GB war memorial).

Said Argentinian hockey player (ex team Captain) was then dropped (despite all thoughts including the Argentinian President that he would be playing), so he trained on Falkland Islanders soil for a backfired advert.

The Argentinian Hockey team then lost to the Great Britain mens team 4-1

The conversation was not about who beats who or who gets the most medals but about a specific ironic point, namely the Argentine in the advert never came to Great Britain to play, despite the advert focussing on it.

Ironic humour,

nicofer1985 #1303 Posted Aug 07 2012 - 19:20

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View Post_Freddy_, on Aug 07 2012 - 10:08, said:

You obviously never read the whole conversation and did not get the irony.

An Argentine hockey player 'Fernando Zylberberg' stared in a certain advert with the inflammatory line "To compete on English soil we train on Argentine soil." (incidently desecrating GB war memorial).

Said Argentinian hockey player (ex team Captain) was then dropped (despite all thoughts including the Argentinian President that he would be playing), so he trained on Falkland Islanders soil for a backfired advert.

The Argentinian Hockey team then lost to the Great Britain mens team 4-1

The conversation was not about who beats who or who gets the most medals but about a specific ironic point, namely the Argentine in the advert never came to Great Britain to play, despite the advert focussing on it.

Ironic humour,

Looks like you never read the whole conversation, bro...
My reply was for Sealteam6, not for you. Sealteam6 said that Great Britain defeating Argentina in the Olympics was "classic", so I mentioned that results.

Want to know my oppinion about the spot? Here you have... It's very critical with my government.

The spot was recorded in the Islands by the marketing company Young&Rubicam (curiously, property of WPP Group, a London-based marketing communications holding company) even before having a customer for it. Once recorded, and due the highly political content, the only customer possible for them was the Argentinian state. Looks like many of our politicians preferred to give our money to a british company instead of paying better training facilities to our athletes... The result was obvious, a couple of weeks of useless controversies (we are going to recover the Islands with a spot? NO... we won more medals in the Olympics? NO) and, months later, worse results to our athletes... I know... politics are dirty everywhere, but that must change... everywhere
The only winner with that spot was the company Young&Rubicam... even taking into account that they has to said in the UK "oh, sorry, we never wanted to create such unrest"... but the money, of course, was in their pockets anyway.

Edited by nicofer1985, Aug 07 2012 - 19:29.


Vollketten #1304 Posted Aug 07 2012 - 19:39

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View Postnicofer1985, on Aug 07 2012 - 19:20, said:

The spot was recorded in the Islands by the marketing company Young&Rubicam (curiously, property of WPP Group, a London-based marketing communications holding company) even before having a customer for it. Once recorded, and due the highly political content, the only customer possible for them was the Argentinian state. Looks like many of our politicians preferred to give our money to a british company instead of paying better training facilities to our athletes... The result was obvious, a couple of weeks of useless controversies (we are going to recover the Islands with a spot? NO... we won more medals in the Olympics? NO) and, months later, worse results to our athletes... I know... politics are dirty everywhere, but that must change... everywhere
The only winner with that spot was the company Young&Rubicam... even taking into account that they has to said in the UK "oh, sorry, we never wanted to create such unrest"... but the money, of course, was in their pockets anyway.

It's obviously all an Imperialist plot.

and this is not an olympics thread either.

Have you got anything about the war to post?

Posted Image
Posted Image


Edit: removed.

Edited by Vollketten, Aug 14 2012 - 14:44.


_Freddy_ #1305 Posted Aug 07 2012 - 20:28

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View Postnicofer1985, on Aug 07 2012 - 19:20, said:

Looks like you never read the whole conversation, bro...
My reply was for Sealteam6, not for you. Sealteam6 said that Great Britain defeating Argentina in the Olympics was "classic", so I mentioned that results.

Want to know my oppinion about the spot? Here you have... It's very critical with my government.

The spot was recorded in the Islands by the marketing company Young&Rubicam (curiously, property of WPP Group, a London-based marketing communications holding company) even before having a customer for it. Once recorded, and due the highly political content, the only customer possible for them was the Argentinian state. Looks like many of our politicians preferred to give our money to a british company instead of paying better training facilities to our athletes... The result was obvious, a couple of weeks of useless controversies (we are going to recover the Islands with a spot? NO... we won more medals in the Olympics? NO) and, months later, worse results to our athletes... I know... politics are dirty everywhere, but that must change... everywhere
The only winner with that spot was the company Young&Rubicam... even taking into account that they has to said in the UK "oh, sorry, we never wanted to create such unrest"... but the money, of course, was in their pockets anyway.

Yes mate and his reply was to me that you chose to quote. So I just filled you in on the rest of it as you seemed to have not read or understood. (The posts did go into more stuff but is outside the scope of the thread and just counters some allegations).

Hence I said you did not read all of the conversation.

Another irony that though that the Argentine Government says to stop buying from British Company's then pays a subsidiary of a British Company for an advert Classic.

nicofer1985 #1306 Posted Aug 07 2012 - 20:44

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View PostVollketten, on Aug 07 2012 - 19:39, said:

It's obviously all an Imperialist plot.

Money has no country, bro... Marketing companies are not patriots, and they are not going to defend my country, not yours either

View Post_Freddy_, on Aug 07 2012 - 20:28, said:

Another irony that though that the Argentine Government says to stop buying from British Company's then pays a subsidiary of a British Company for an advert Classic.

Sadly, politics are extremely ironic sometimes... But we are far offtopic, so I'm out

_Freddy_ #1307 Posted Aug 07 2012 - 20:50

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Not found any good pictures of this in the Falklands but one of the more unusual British Armoured Vehicles taken there

FV180 Combat Engineer Tractor CET (commonly called the Frog). Originally an armoured swimming, digging machine. It proved very versatile in its service and had a very low ground pressure. Crew of 2 who face one way for road driving but opposite ways for digging (both crew man have driving controls).

Towing Giant Viper mine clearing line charge
http://www.one35th.c...t/cmv_cet7s.jpg
4 Tonne Crane
http://www.one35th.c...t/cmv_cet8s.jpg
Carrying Class 60 trackway, lays from the bucket
http://www.one35th.c...t/cmv_cet9s.jpg
Just leaving the water with floatation kit and rocket assisted earth anchor fitted
http://www.one35th.c...t/cmv_cet3s.jpg
Firing the anchor
http://www.one35th.c...t/cmv_cet5s.jpg
Maxi Fascine, lays from the bucket
http://www.one35th.c...t/cmv_cet4s.jpg

Vollketten #1308 Posted Aug 07 2012 - 21:07

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View Postnicofer1985, on Aug 07 2012 - 20:44, said:

Money has no country, bro... Marketing companies are not patriots, and they are not going to defend my country, not yours either
You really struggle with irony/satire/sarcasm don't you?
Try posting stuff on the war next time.

Editted.

Edited by Vollketten, Aug 08 2012 - 14:21.


nuttybiscuit #1309 Posted Aug 08 2012 - 01:37

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View Post_Freddy_, on Aug 07 2012 - 20:50, said:

Not found any good pictures of this in the Falklands but one of the more unusual British Armoured Vehicles taken there

FV180 Combat Engineer Tractor CET (commonly called the Frog). Originally an armoured swimming, digging machine. It proved very versatile in its service and had a very low ground pressure. Crew of 2 who face one way for road driving but opposite ways for digging (both crew man have driving controls).

Towing Giant Viper mine clearing line charge
http://www.one35th.c...t/cmv_cet7s.jpg
4 Tonne Crane
http://www.one35th.c...t/cmv_cet8s.jpg
Carrying Class 60 trackway, lays from the bucket
http://www.one35th.c...t/cmv_cet9s.jpg
Just leaving the water with floatation kit and rocket assisted earth anchor fitted
http://www.one35th.c...t/cmv_cet3s.jpg
Firing the anchor
http://www.one35th.c...t/cmv_cet5s.jpg
Maxi Fascine, lays from the bucket
http://www.one35th.c...t/cmv_cet4s.jpg

finally someone posts something interesting after a long dry stretch of patriotic drivel driven ping-pong in this thread,

+1 and keep it up

edit : and can people drop the hostility ? This thread does not belong to two different viewpoints with their accompagnying campaigning posters.....

Edited by nuttybiscuit, Aug 08 2012 - 01:41.


The_Chieftain #1310 Posted Aug 08 2012 - 02:19

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I'm inclined to agree with the last line. Cut back a little on the baiting please, or we'll start sanctioning people.

_Freddy_ #1311 Posted Aug 08 2012 - 10:44

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A rather busy deck showing a CET with anchor fitted, loaded onto a landing craft, 2 x Class 30 trackway rolls can be seen next to the CVR(T). Space seems to have been at a premium so the deck serves as a recreation area.

http://hmvf.co.uk/fo...=1&d=1269173539

Vollketten #1312 Posted Aug 08 2012 - 14:20

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some more vehicles in the Falklands. this time, Activ Fisher Snow Tracs, one towing a capturing argentine field gun
Posted Image

_Freddy_ #1313 Posted Aug 08 2012 - 17:12

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The Globe Store locals said it had been set on fire by Argentine troops at the surrender along with several other buildings. This shot is before the Snow Tracs were put there and part of the same series, it shows several OTO Melara Mod 56 105mm howitzers.

Posted Image

Vollketten #1314 Posted Aug 08 2012 - 17:15

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View Post_Freddy_, on Aug 08 2012 - 17:12, said:

The Globe Store locals said it had been set on fire by Argentine troops at the surrender along with several other buildings. This shot is before the Snow Tracs were put there and part of the same series, it shows several OTO Melara Mod 56 105mm howitzers.

From the Falklands War timeline it just says 'destroyed by Argentine arsonist on 15th June' It doesn't make it clear whether the fire setting was as a result of a command directive or not. General Menedez was assiduous in not wanting combat in the streets of Stanley to save lives so it seems unlikely that he would order his troops to burn the town down.

Edited by Vollketten, Aug 09 2012 - 20:21.


_Freddy_ #1315 Posted Aug 08 2012 - 18:58

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View PostVollketten, on Aug 08 2012 - 17:15, said:

From the Falklands War timeline it just says 'destroyed by Argentine arsonist on 15th June' It doesn't make it clear whether the fire setting was as a result of a command directive or not. General Menedez was assiduous in not wanting combat in the streets of Stanley to save lives so it seems unlikely that he would order his troops to burn the twon down.

As I said it was locals who reported it to the press and several authors who have published it. It does not seem to have been organised but more an individual action.

This eyewitness report was published in the Telegraph and was reported by, Nigel Farndale, Graham Bound and Nisha Lilia Diu who did the interviews.

Quote

Lewis Clifton, 56, a former Post Office worker and member of the Port Stanley fire brigade, on life after the occupation

Filth, degradation, destruction; those are the things that come to mind when I think of Stanley in the aftermath of the conflict. The town was normally home to just a few thousand people, then suddenly had to cope with thousands of extra Argentine and British soldiers. The place just couldn’t take it. There was only sporadic electricity and water and the sanitation system collapsed. The streets were ankle-deep in human waste. The stench was awful, really awful, and we were all suffering from what we called Galtieri’s revenge. He lost the war but left us ill.

Thousands of Argentine prisoners just seemed to wander around freely for some time after the surrender. They had been isolated in an area east of the town, and they were being brought back up to Stanley for embarkation onto ships, but that system broke down when too many were released from the holding area. They just ran amok and were responsible for wanton destruction, including setting fire to buildings.

During the occupation, the fire engines had all been taken off us, and we had to wrestle them back on June 14 to cope with those fires. I remember when the Globe Store went up in flames, we had the greatest difficulty pumping water up from the pier because we were being virtually beaten up by bloody Argentine POWs in the darkened streets.

My first encounter with British soldiers was on the night of the surrender. We had been out fighting fires, and met some Paras. They certainly looked like lean, mean fighting machines. They were near the embers of a fire that had destroyed a house. Obviously, they were pleased that things were over, and we were certainly pleased to see them.

For some time afterwards, we and the British troops helped ourselves to Argentine supplies. Some people have described it as looting, but it was more like the spoils of war. The place was suffering shortages of flour and sugar and other basics, and the Argentines had left containers of food dotted around the town. The shocking thing about this was that they had not distributed it to their own men.

Now the town is more than twice the size. It’s had major infrastructural improvements, and it’s a much better place to live. But some things don’t change: when we were growing up here before the war, fresh fruit was rare, and you still can’t buy bananas today. But we’re Falkland Islanders: we’ve learnt to make do.

Edited by _Freddy_, Aug 08 2012 - 18:59.


Vollketten #1316 Posted Aug 09 2012 - 16:31

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Posted Imagehttp://img696.images...6382994.jpgoops
http://img534.images...82399971479.jpg

Edited by Vollketten, Aug 09 2012 - 17:19.


_Freddy_ #1317 Posted Aug 09 2012 - 18:47

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View PostVollketten, on Aug 09 2012 - 16:31, said:

Posted Image


Wahooo where did you find the frog pic. A real beast to crew - fantastic bit of kit but at the same time a swine to maintain.

Vollketten #1318 Posted Aug 09 2012 - 20:20

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View Post_Freddy_, on Aug 09 2012 - 18:47, said:

Wahooo where did you find the frog pic. A real beast to crew - fantastic bit of kit but at the same time a swine to maintain.
I spent too much time searching clearly....I couldnt figure out what the hell it was until I realised that I was looking at the vehicle it is 'other' direction, because I was used to seeing it from the other end. It is driving away from the camera.

Edited by Vollketten, Aug 09 2012 - 20:20.


Sealteam6 #1319 Posted Aug 09 2012 - 20:29

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Quote:

Lewis Clifton, 56, a former Post Office worker and member of the Port Stanley fire brigade, on life after the occupation
Filth, degradation, destruction; those are the things that come to mind when I think of Stanley in the aftermath of the conflict. The town was normally home to just a few thousand people, then suddenly had to cope with thousands of extra Argentine and British soldiers. The place just couldn’t take it. There was only sporadic electricity and water and the sanitation system collapsed. The streets were ankle-deep in human waste. The stench was awful, really awful, and we were all suffering from what we called Galtieri’s revenge. He lost the war but left us ill.
Thousands of Argentine prisoners just seemed to wander around freely for some time after the surrender. They had been isolated in an area east of the town, and they were being brought back up to Stanley for embarkation onto ships, but that system broke down when too many were released from the holding area. They just ran amok and were responsible for wanton destruction, including setting fire to buildings.
During the occupation, the fire engines had all been taken off us, and we had to wrestle them back on June 14 to cope with those fires. I remember when the Globe Store went up in flames, we had the greatest difficulty pumping water up from the pier because we were being virtually beaten up by bloody Argentine POWs in the darkened streets.
My first encounter with British soldiers was on the night of the surrender. We had been out fighting fires, and met some Paras. They certainly looked like lean, mean fighting machines. They were near the embers of a fire that had destroyed a house. Obviously, they were pleased that things were over, and we were certainly pleased to see them.
For some time afterwards, we and the British troops helped ourselves to Argentine supplies. Some people have described it as looting, but it was more like the spoils of war. The place was suffering shortages of flour and sugar and other basics, and the Argentines had left containers of food dotted around the town. The shocking thing about this was that they had not distributed it to their own men.
Now the town is more than twice the size. It’s had major infrastructural improvements, and it’s a much better place to live. But some things don’t change: when we were growing up here before the war, fresh fruit was rare, and you still can’t buy bananas today. But we’re Falkland Islanders: we’ve learnt to make do.

Unquote:

Well that Vindicates me & my earlier posts, I got my information off Guys I know who were there at the Sharp end, Good Friends & old Comrades from 45 Commando & 2 Para.
I'll sit back & wait for the Apologies to roll in from the South.

Freddy, I saw a Frog at Duxford in the Infantry Museum in the Argentine invasion section, they are a lot smaller than it looks in the Pic, what's the hard part about maintenance?
My only experience in Armour is watching an M1113 Crew repairing Tracks, (or shooting wrecks with the Laws or Carl Gustav) they were kind enough to give me the slightly bent track pins after woods, said they make great Tent pegs, which they do, gave one to a friend who makes knifes & Daggers for a hobby & he made a beauty with it, said it was excellent hardened steel.

_Freddy_ #1320 Posted Aug 09 2012 - 21:21

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View PostSealteam6, on Aug 09 2012 - 20:29, said:


Freddy, I saw a Frog at Duxford in the Infantry Museum in the Argentine invasion section, they are a lot smaller than it looks in the Pic, what's the hard part about maintenance?
My only experience in Armour is watching an M1113 Crew repairing Tracks, (or shooting wrecks with the Laws or Carl Gustav) they were kind enough to give me the slightly bent track pins after woods, said they make great Tent pegs, which they do, gave one to a friend who makes knifes & Daggers for a hobby & he made a beauty with it, said it was excellent hardened steel.

Basically you have a bulldozer with all the attendant hydraulics and a winch with aluminium armour slapped all over it bringing it in at 18 tonnes, 2 dowty water jets to propel it when it is in the water and a very cramped crew compartment, dual driving controls so the vehicle could be operated by the crew sitting back to back which speeded up digging immensely (although for normal driving on the road the bucket was at the back and both crew faced the same way.

They were awkward to work on, to do much work on the engine you have to remove all the armoured top decks (Due to the fact that it was designed to swim every hatch and deck plate was bolted down and sealed against water ingress), the engine is not a simple pack like in most modern armoured vehicles it comes apart in pieces. No simple engine lift. They were prone to oil leaks, you could always tell a Frog Op by the oil impregnated in his skin lol. .

The biggest problem in my troop was a lack of crewmen (no one wanted to be a frog op) so we had to look after more than one, we also had several A4000 Muirhill Light Wheeled Tractors LWT and a hideous contraption called the Light Mobile Digger LMD on an ancient Thornycroft Nubian chassis (designed by the coal board). If they had a dedicated crew to work on them all the time they were pretty good though. I loved them.

You had an electrically fired rocket propelled anchor mounted on the top, which did not always lose the explosive retaining bolts when fired (so the crews said, I reckon they forgot) in which case you got a bit hot in the crew compartment and the top armour deck got very hot.

Nicknamed the Frog as when it is swimming pretty much all you can see above water are the two crew hatches, pretty hairy to drive down a bank into a river.