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Question about german tracks


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Fishrokk #21 Posted Oct 23 2014 - 21:35

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The connector pins in the early track look like they take a lot of wear.  Perhaps something about the nature of having each track link bear weight puts some of that weight on the connector pin, reducing the lifetime and introducing or greatly exacerbating a critical breakage point.  Versus, of course, for some reason only having every other track link bear weight relieves the connector pins from bearing weight.

 

Another difference between the two designs is the number of overlaps between each track piece.  On the early designs, the connector pin only goes through each link three or four times, where on the later there are seven or eight eyes that the pin goes through on each link.



SunnyKim #22 Posted Oct 23 2014 - 21:40

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The 18-tooth sprockets of the early vehicles suffered from excessive wear of every second tooth, because of the uneven pitch of the double link track, and so the number of teeth was halved in the later vehicles. In May 1944 a new, improved double link track was introduced. The original track had guide teeth on every link whereas the new one was distinguished by having teeth only on every second link. The prototype vehicles had the original track but nearly all others had the second type of track. This included early vehicles built with 18 tooth sprockets, though this may have been due to refitting in the field.

 

http://preservedtank...Id=210&Select=1

 

waste product for the win....



Lion0 #23 Posted Oct 23 2014 - 21:41

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My guess is that it's got something to do with weight of the tank and ground resistance of tracks on different surfaces (mud, frozen ground, etc) to maximize grip.

 

That being said, the two contact bars closer together (with a flat spacer between) could help it dig and get better grip versus the links being identical and the contact bars equally spaced.



acosnil #24 Posted Oct 23 2014 - 22:00

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Block Quote

 

Why did they move to such an elaborate system, requiring twice the components, thus twice the logistical load? Wouldn't it be easier to just stick with a single link type track system?

 

 

Weight of the tank. Tiger needed wider treads so it didn't just sink into the ground, which meant wider tread segments, which meant more elaborate layouts to evenly distribute load stress.

 

 

That and making sure it can climb hills and other obstacles at an incline, so in a sense traction.



Colddawg #25 Posted Oct 24 2014 - 14:48

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I'm not sure about the answer that the size limits the minimum required space between track guide horns.  That may have something to do with it, but probably not the whole answer.  The Tiger I and Tiger II were similar in suspension layout and size and the Tiger I didn't use the 2 piece track design like that of the Tiger II.  I believe it may have to do with ground pressure.  The two piece track links show up on the Tiger II, Jagdtiger, and Maus.  The only vehicle that breaks this theory, being similar in weight to the Tiger II, is the Sturmtiger.

collimatrix #26 Posted Oct 24 2014 - 16:11

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The tiger II is the only mass-produced tank that has two layers of road wheels (panther and tiger I have three layers).  This means that as the track passes by the road wheels, the weight of the vehicle is being applied, alternatingly, to the left and to the right of the centerline of the track links.  On a tank with conventional tracks or three layers of road wheels, the weight is applied centerline.

 

This means that, uniquely, the tiger II's track links are being twisted by the road wheels; a very unusual way to apply load.

 

The two-link design may be some way to shorten track pitch and improve track life in view of the unusual twisting load.  Just a guess.



SunnyKim #27 Posted Oct 25 2014 - 17:35

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people still theorizing .... click links people.... learn german.... its because the old design wore out every other tooth on the sprocket so they switched to the two piece design and went to a 9 tooth sprocket  instead of 18 tooth with updated two piece track links.... read people.... read

collimatrix #28 Posted Oct 26 2014 - 18:52

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View PostSunnyKim, on Oct 25 2014 - 18:35, said:

people still theorizing .... click links people.... learn german.... its because the old design wore out every other tooth on the sprocket so they switched to the two piece design and went to a 9 tooth sprocket  instead of 18 tooth with updated two piece track links.... read people.... read

 

Read people, read.

 

The link clearly states that the 18 tooth design had uneven wear because it was already a two-piece link design.



SunnyKim #29 Posted Oct 27 2014 - 18:28

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at least someone is paying attention.... correct, but the first design was shite so they came up with a different design

Colddawg #30 Posted Oct 30 2014 - 15:07

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View Postcollimatrix, on Oct 24 2014 - 11:11, said:

The tiger II is the only mass-produced tank that has two layers of road wheels (panther and tiger I have three layers).  This means that as the track passes by the road wheels, the weight of the vehicle is being applied, alternatingly, to the left and to the right of the centerline of the track links.  On a tank with conventional tracks or three layers of road wheels, the weight is applied centerline.

 

This means that, uniquely, the tiger II's track links are being twisted by the road wheels; a very unusual way to apply load.

 

The two-link design may be some way to shorten track pitch and improve track life in view of the unusual twisting load.  Just a guess.

 

I would tend to agree with this, but the Maus has 2 bogie sets applying ground pressure evenly on the lateral plain causing the weight applied to stay centered and it has the 2 piece links.

collimatrix #31 Posted Nov 03 2014 - 14:15

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View PostColddawg, on Oct 30 2014 - 15:07, said:

 

I would tend to agree with this, but the Maus has 2 bogie sets applying ground pressure evenly on the lateral plain causing the weight applied to stay centered and it has the 2 piece links.

 

Good point Colddawg.




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