Jump to content


Christie suspension and Torsion bar


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

kirandrtanker #1 Posted Jan 09 2015 - 02:10

    Sergeant

  • Players
  • 10473 battles
  • 137
  • Member since:
    12-01-2012
Whats the difference between the 2? they both look very similar to eachother

Absols_blade #2 Posted Jan 09 2015 - 02:11

    Captain

  • Players
  • 15626 battles
  • 1,510
  • [-STAB] -STAB
  • Member since:
    09-18-2011

They're the same item, and do the same function, but have different names.

this is regarding the in game items



TwixOps #3 Posted Jan 09 2015 - 02:16

    Major

  • Players
  • 51637 battles
  • 4,545
  • Member since:
    04-29-2011

Christie suspension is characterized by extremely large vertical springs being placed on the inside of the roadwheels for support.  It is famed for its extremely large range of movemement giving excellent cross-country performance and obstacle traversal but is unsteady, prone to rocking, and will not work for a vehicle of over ~30 tons.  In addition, christie suspension takes up a huge amount of space inside the vehicle.  

 

Torsion bar suspension uses large historical bars across the bed of the vehicle to accomplish suspension, it is more advanced, provides good cross-country performance and a quite steady ride.  

 

In-game, they accomplish the same function.  


Edited by TwixOps, Jan 09 2015 - 02:16.


Walter_Sobchak #4 Posted Jan 09 2015 - 02:20

    Major

  • Beta Testers
  • 236 battles
  • 5,140
  • Member since:
    11-22-2010

Christie suspensions generally refer to the suspension systems designed by American maverick tank designer Walter Christie in the 1920's and 1930's.  These were some of the first suspensions for tanks with independently sprung wheels, that is, each wheel could move up and down independently of the other wheels, unlike other 20's and 30's era suspensions where wheels were linked together on interconnected arms.  Christie designs typically relied upon large L shaped arms and coil springs.  These were mounted inside the hull, thus taking up a certain amount of interior space.  Christie tried to sell his system to the US Army but it was rejected, as much for money and personality reason than because of the performance of his designs.  However, both the British and the Soviets were impressed and both went on to incorporate Christie style suspensions into their WW2 tanks.  The Soviet T-34 had a Christie style system, as did the British Cruiser tanks (Crusader, Cromwell, Comet.)

 

Torsion bar suspensions also offer independently sprung wheels.  However, the wheel is mounted on an arm that is connected to a torsion bar that runs across the width of the tank. The bar twists, providing the spring action.  The first tank put into wide scale production with a torsion bar system was the German Pz III.  The German Tiger and Panther tanks would have torsion bar suspensions, as would the Soviet KV Heavy tank and the US M24 chaffee and M26 Pershing.  Torsion bars would become the standard in most post war tank designs, the British being the only exception, preferring their Horstmann style systems.  The Christie style fell out of favor after the war.  It really does not cope well with tanks beyond 30 tons. 



Walter_Sobchak #5 Posted Jan 09 2015 - 02:32

    Major

  • Beta Testers
  • 236 battles
  • 5,140
  • Member since:
    11-22-2010

A while back I had posted this old article from International Defense Review on tank suspensions on my blog.  It's worth a look.

 

 

 

 



KaiserWilhelmShatner #6 Posted Jan 09 2015 - 03:31

    Major

  • Players
  • 17067 battles
  • 4,989
  • Member since:
    03-03-2012

Torsion Bar Suspension (concept)

 

Christie Suspension (concept)



Walter_Sobchak #7 Posted Jan 09 2015 - 03:56

    Major

  • Beta Testers
  • 236 battles
  • 5,140
  • Member since:
    11-22-2010

That Panther suspension system is a cool video, but it's not representative of most torsion bar systems.  The Panther was, as far as I know, the only tank to use a double torsion bar system.  It gave excellent performance, but was rather complicated, heavy and bulky compared to a single bar system.  In post war vehicles, they were able to achieve the "double" advantage of the Panther system but in a much more compact design called 'tube over bar."  In this system, the torsion bar is inside a tube that also acts like a spring, thus giving twice the spring movement in a given length. 

 



SlinginShells #8 Posted Jan 14 2015 - 03:37

    Corporal

  • Players
  • 5940 battles
  • 16
  • Member since:
    09-22-2013
Not terrible

Meplat #9 Posted Jan 14 2015 - 03:54

    Major

  • Players
  • 6774 battles
  • 7,831
  • [C-BOO] C-BOO
  • Member since:
    11-27-2012

View PostWalter_Sobchak, on Jan 08 2015 - 18:20, said:

Christie suspensions generally refer to the suspension systems designed by American maverick tank designer Walter Christie in the 1920's and 1930's.  These were some of the first suspensions for tanks with independently sprung wheels, that is, each wheel could move up and down independently of the other wheels, unlike other 20's and 30's era suspensions where wheels were linked together on interconnected arms.  Christie designs typically relied upon large L shaped arms and coil springs.  These were mounted inside the hull, thus taking up a certain amount of interior space.  Christie tried to sell his system to the US Army but it was rejected, as much for money and personality reason than because of the performance of his designs.  However, both the British and the Soviets were impressed and both went on to incorporate Christie style suspensions into their WW2 tanks.  The Soviet T-34 had a Christie style system, as did the British Cruiser tanks (Crusader, Cromwell, Comet.)

 

Torsion bar suspensions also offer independently sprung wheels.  However, the wheel is mounted on an arm that is connected to a torsion bar that runs across the width of the tank. The bar twists, providing the spring action.  The first tank put into wide scale production with a torsion bar system was the German Pz III.  The German Tiger and Panther tanks would have torsion bar suspensions, as would the Soviet KV Heavy tank and the US M24 chaffee and M26 Pershing.  Torsion bars would become the standard in most post war tank designs, the British being the only exception, preferring their Horstmann style systems.  The Christie style fell out of favor after the war.  It really does not cope well with tanks beyond 30 tons. 

 

Spot on.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users