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Surviving Basic Training


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Prima_Vox #101 Posted Jul 21 2015 - 18:45

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Sorry....got a bit off topic there....

 

Like Chieftain said.

 

Do what you're told (secret to my marriage).


Edited by ArcherII, Jul 21 2015 - 18:53.


Meplat #102 Posted Jul 22 2015 - 02:12

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View PostArcherII, on Jul 21 2015 - 10:45, said:

Sorry....got a bit off topic there....

 

Like Chieftain said.

 

Do what you're told (secret to my marriage).

Guess I missed something but- Yeah.

Once painted the same wall six times.  Great way to learn a squadron [edited]. (The acronym for "Chain Of Command" is edited it seems..)

That was one F*cked up looking wall, but the cappy was happy.


Edited by Meplat, Jul 22 2015 - 02:13.


Baddy_ #103 Posted Jul 22 2015 - 04:25

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I go for BCT January 04, 2016. US Army Airborne. Basic in Leonard Wood, then Airborne School at Benning. Job title 12B1 Combat Engineer.

Prima_Vox #104 Posted Jul 22 2015 - 15:33

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Okay....lemme see....

 

Basic Airborne June 1981.

 

Jumpmaster, August 1983

 

Ranger, Aug-Sep 1992

 

 

Lord, do I feel old.....:amazed:



Insurrectional_Leftist #105 Posted Jul 22 2015 - 23:12

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Posted Image

 

Posted Image

 

Lackland AFB, San Antonio, TX

For me Dec. 1981

 

Apr 1982...  Shepard AFB, Wichita Falls, TX

 

Telecommunications Operations Specialist

(another words Encryption/Decryption, Communications of Classified materials

 for intelligence, CIA, Command traffic, Satellite intelligence, Communications Command

 Electronic Emissions, security, etc.)  (Short: Spy Stuff)

 

Same stuff: McChord AFB, WA  Tacoma/Seattle (1985)

                   Eglin AFB, Ft. Walton Beach, Fla. (1983)

                   Incirlik AB, Turkey (1984)

   an later:   118 Air Lift Wing, Berry Field, Nashville, TN 1987-1990

 

TAC

SAC

MAC

AFCC

AFSC

Commands ^

 

 

   Our Squadron Drill Instructor was an Ex-Marine Drill instructor, before becoming an Air Force Drill Instructor (TI).  As you know the Air Force is know for its Head Games it plays when in training.  Many times they can be psychological, as well as a combination of real world urgency senarios etc.

 

One night, as we each took our shifts being awaken by each other to do our Squadron guard duty around the 24 hr. clock at night, the person just before me was up at 2:00 Am.  A Drill Instructor (TI) came up to the window of the door only for a 4 sec. flash showed his ID, and the Airman, then asked to see it again.  Upon doing so, the Airman ascertained that TI was not to be granted access, because he name was not on the cleared list (which it wasn't).   The TI then began yelling and an screaming, "You will let me in, because I order you to do so etc." The yelling awaken us up.  Then the TI went away.  A few mins. later the (TI) returned, but this time with a Sledge Hammer !!

 

He began beating and tearing the steal secure door down off the hinges!!  WE all got up ran to the door as it was beginning to bust off the hinges.  Finally, someone called our (TI) and the Lackland SP's (Security Police).....    After the door had been torn down, we were like, "Maybe we should jump him?"  "We keep saying are you sure he is not on the list?"  He said, "NO HE IS NOT"

 

Finally, our TI arrived.

 

It wasn't but within  a few hours that morning, did we learn that "This was a TEST" to see if the Airman, would give in and let in the NCO/TI Drill Instructor on his word only based on his rank, and authority etc.   Needless to say, everyone on base was terrified that day forward to make sure, I.D.s, photos, list of names, conditions of entry of whom, during when etc. were then closely observed.....

 

 

------------------

 

As far as our making of beds, it was a lot tougher. If the hospital corner was not correct enough, he grabbed the entire bed with his hand (he was very strong), and turned the bed upside down, and it fell into pieces.  The next week, if even one bed was not done properly to his satisfaction, we were sent to the day room while he over turned ALL THE BEDS (even the right ones) upside down into the floor into a giant pile.  Then told the squad leaders to go sort it out themselves.  Then after 10 mins. of this, he came back to room, and yelled like SGT. Hartmann on full-metal jacket at us, and said, "Ladies, get your &*&*&*&*&*&* in there and if it ever happens again, each person will be assigned to do this once a week"

 

-------------------

 

He used to go to the chalk board everyday, and put up little stick people against your name, to show how many people he figured you killed each day, because you didn't do your job well enough for that day etc....

 

It's all about the head games.....

 

-------------------------------

 

AND THOSE STEEL TAPS ON THE SHOES......

 

:trollface:     you could tell you were in trouble when the taps were getting close to you..........


Edited by Baader_Meinhoff_Complex, Jul 23 2015 - 18:04.


Insurrectional_Leftist #106 Posted Jul 22 2015 - 23:25

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View PostMeplat, on Jul 20 2015 - 15:05, said:

This, for damn sure.   One of the best things I did while going through post-op PT was to visit the base library and feed coins into the photocopier, making copies of everything.

In my case I have a folder about 2.5"~ 3" thick.

Years (decades) later when some doc asks what was done and when, you're not trying to brush the dust off of the brain housing unit to deliver the info.

 

View PostArcherII, on Jul 20 2015 - 14:49, said:

So...on that subject I just went through a re-eval and now am at 50%....the magic number since I get concurrent pay for it (it's about $500 a month--still rather have my knee).

 

You have to be really, really, really persistent, and exercise a goodly amount of patience  (took two years for this look).  Also, appeal everything.

 

For you  youngsters who are in or going in....save every piece of medical paperwork you get.  And when you're sick or broke GO TO THE CLINIC!!!!  I spent a good part of my career on Jump Status and we didn't like to get administratively terminated due to injury (lose the pay if it goes long enough) so we'd avoid the Doc.  Bad habit to get into.

 

The only reason I get the amount I get is because of one little Doctors slip in my record documenting a back injury in 1996.  Had I not gotten that documented I would have gotten basically nothing.  Also, for those retiring or ETSing....do your PHYSICAL!!! (Before you leave Active Duty).   I'm still amazed by the number of folks who do not do this.

 

 

 

Listen up guys.  Listen to what they are telling you here ^^^^ to all current military and vets.

 

About your medical file.  When I got out, there was no one telling people what even vets know now currently even.  Make sure not just to make copies, but also make them DOCUMENT & WRITE DOWN things they should be writing down.  The military is very bad about this, and those records come up lost, or misplaced down the road, when you file a disability claim with the VA later after you are out.

 

Trust me.

 

Thousands, and thousands of vets are fighting for benefits in the system right now, because of this.  My current disability claim has been battling for about 8 years now.... and still raging on.  The VA system has made some improvements, and has a heck of a way to go yet.....  The system is painful with "Service Connection' of Disabilities.  The VA has been investigated by the Feds even recently on this. I go to my VA center all time and I keep up on this.

 

Documentation for anything you must have.  We could talk for hours on this.....


Edited by Baader_Meinhoff_Complex, Jul 22 2015 - 23:27.


stalkervision #107 Posted Jul 23 2015 - 12:25

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I can not stand how the government treats vets in this country. I can not tell you how angry this makes me. They are all " we support the troops" but it is pure [edited].

Insurrectional_Leftist #108 Posted Jul 23 2015 - 17:58

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View Poststalkervision, on Jul 23 2015 - 11:25, said:

I can not stand how the government treats vets in this country. I can not tell you how angry this makes me. They are all " we support the troops" but it is pure [edited].

 

 

It's an absolute fact.  They are always waving flags, singing the praises, and saying thank you for your service etc....  But, you know what?  "When it comes time to live up to the veterans at the local VA, when they come back with in a wheel chair, or with a mental disability like PTSD, Nervous disorders, Depression, and can no longer adapt to real society when they come back home take their lives.  Veterans waiting years battling for service related connections, where the VA, or the military either lost, misplaced, or in some cases even destroyed records (which they were finally caught doing at some VA centers), which make service connected disabilities possible.  Denials soar, some veterans wait for years, and even die before benefits are finally awarded.

 

On the 4th of July, (about 18 days ago)  My nieces husband, who served 6 active battle tours in Iraq, Afghanistan, who served in the U.S. Army as a forward Scout for the main Armored Spearheads (tanks) in those invasions (he was very good at it, and highly decorated for it), also served in special operations dealing with insurgents and scouting forward positions, which this is known as a high stress position with major responsibilities, was in Colorado on the 4th, and took his life with a gun while still on active duty.

 

He had saw so much death, carnage, bloody things, high intensity stressful situations, near life and death situations, and even had to kill in fact himself on many occasions to advance forward positions, and watch many die for his intelligence scouting work,,,, That when he return in the last few years could no longer adjust to life in society over here anymore.

 

That's why when you call the VA that always have that suicide hot-line number.

 

They are literally dying by the day, when they come back home.

 

There are all sorts of problems they have to deal with coming back home, where they can no longer re-adjust back into the world over here again.

 

This country has always had a terrible attitude helping their veterans getting their benefits, disabilities, proper treatment and help they need to come back home with.  It goes back to politics here back home, budget people in Washington, the fact that they don't want to pay out "THE TRUE COST OF THE WAR"....  The private contractors, the Military Industrial Complex, has made its billions already, now the real cost is left upon everyone else.


Edited by Baader_Meinhoff_Complex, Jul 23 2015 - 18:01.


AssaultPlazma #109 Posted Jul 24 2015 - 05:57

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Enlisting in the US Army already took the ASVAB and are medically proved. Im just waiting on a freakin 19K slot to open up! The wait is killing me lol! 

bretylium #110 Posted Dec 20 2015 - 02:52

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I didn't realize you went to basic in 2001 Chieftan! I was already in Germany in 1st Armored, 1st BDE, 1/36 INF (MECH) after having come back from deployment to the Balkans. Surprising how it only feels like yesterday!

bretylium #111 Posted Dec 20 2015 - 02:56

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View PostDerHeer, on Jul 22 2015 - 03:25, said:

I go for BCT January 04, 2016. US Army Airborne. Basic in Leonard Wood, then Airborne School at Benning. Job title 12B1 Combat Engineer.

 

Wait until you see those jump towers and that small building covered in those Airborne Unit Patch Symbols.....I did Basic at Benning, AIT at Sam Houston (medic). The cab driver from the airport dropped me off at the airborne school by accident instead of the 30th AG and I had to get myself to reception (eventually) despite having no money on me to pay the nice cab driver who was nice to me and gave me a freebie :)

Alptraumsong #112 Posted Dec 20 2015 - 17:10

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What is BMT like in England?

 

Was considering signing up with the SANDF, but the military is a shambles.

 

Thinking of getting my VISA and going over over to the UK (my aunt immigrated years ago).

 

Did a draughting course(taken further can help getting into engineering) this year and am going to pursue a career in that direction, but would like to do the army thing. A friend from class has a brother who immigrated and is a lieutenant  in the British army, the friend also wanting to go over.



Kaeto1 #113 Posted Apr 03 2016 - 03:20

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I went to Navy boot at Great Lakes Illinois on March 18 1981.  We had a Chief (E-7) as our company commander, and the company was sponsored by the Saginaw Gears Hockey team. https://en.wikipedia...naw_Gears_(IHL) As a result of that while en-route to boot from Detroit we went to Frankenmuth Mi. for dinner at Zehnder's  http://www.zehnders....estaurant.htm   Then we got to watch the Gears play.

 

After we got to Great Mistakes boot wasn't too bad.  But I drove the company commander nuts when we went through the gas chamber. I'm immune to the effects of CS and CN gas. But One time I messed up and got ASMO'd to another company later in the training.  It turned out to be a better company. Our CC only punished us when we really deserved it. I ended up becoming the Division Master at Arms for my company. When we left boot I saw my original CC directing traffic and he was wearing the rank of Seaman (E-3).  He'd been busted because he had found a boot who had a rack chit from medical in his rack (an upper) yanked him out of the rack and let him drop to the deck breaking his arm and cracking his skull. The Courts Martial only let him stay in because he was only 4 months from full pay retirement.  But he ended up retiring on E-3 pay.


Edited by Kaeto1, Apr 03 2016 - 03:22.


Beausabre #114 Posted Nov 11 2018 - 04:39

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"What about AROTC? "


 

I wish I could respond to you, but it's been 45 (!) years since ROTC Advanced Camp and the program has almost completely changed. A lot of what we did at camp is now done on campus. Much more of influence on a cadet's life than in my day, and I was a gung-ho scholarship cadet who intended to make the Army my career. Camp is more like a four week Leader Reaction Course, trying to see how much you have learned back there and what sort of leader you are. Still, one of Nick's points is still true  - they want you to graduate. Also "cooperate and graduate". Here's what my alma mater's website has to say

http://army.psu.edu/training/

Remember that being a leader is a privilege - the American People have entrusted us with the lives of their sons and daughters. It can be a heavy burden (Fleet Admiral William F Halsey upon getting the signal "Cease fire. Cease fire. The war is over" stated his reaction was "Thank God I will never again have to send another man out to die") but the rewards in terms of personal satisfaction and a sense you are doing something that matters is great.

Good luck!


 


 


 


 


 

       






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