Jump to content


M60A3 Laser and ballistic computer


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

Noble #1 Posted Dec 10 2015 - 09:54

    Staff sergeant

  • Players
  • 7312 battles
  • 465
  • Member since:
    04-30-2011

I had a question or so concerning the ballistic computer and laser operations on the M60A3. How exactly does the gunner go from getting the target and firing? Does he lase the target which transfers information too the ballistic computer and make adjustments? Or does the ballistic computer move the gun itself once it has the information from the laser? 

 

Step by step would be great. Thanks.



Blackhorse_Six_ #2 Posted Dec 10 2015 - 12:29

    Major

  • Players
  • 44159 battles
  • 10,030
  • [HHT] HHT
  • Member since:
    03-19-2011

Trolling, Noble?

 

I attended my lieutentant's course with a fellow named Noble ... He was Sheridan crew in Vietnam ...

 

AIR, LRF return is manually sent to the computer, which then sets the super-elevation for the range to tgt and round selected (weight of round) ...

 

For M60A3 with TTS, round-selection was on a four-button panel ...

 

No apologies for the Oxford comma ... :sceptic:



zloykrolik #3 Posted Dec 12 2015 - 05:27

    Staff sergeant

  • Players
  • 30297 battles
  • 409
  • [RDTT2] RDTT2
  • Member since:
    05-05-2012
The gunner lased the target to get the range.

The_Chieftain #4 Posted Dec 12 2015 - 05:51

    Military Specialist

  • Administrator
  • 10004 battles
  • 9,550
  • [WGA-A] WGA-A
  • Member since:
    09-08-2011
Right, but the question is "Did the computer apply super-elevation and lead to the gun, or to the sight?" I actually don't know off the top of my head.

Evil_Closet_Monkey #5 Posted Dec 12 2015 - 06:59

    Corporal

  • Players
  • 3783 battles
  • 39
  • Member since:
    07-03-2011
According to the TM 9-2350-253-20-2 the adjustments are applied to the gun.

zloykrolik #6 Posted Dec 12 2015 - 07:13

    Staff sergeant

  • Players
  • 30297 battles
  • 409
  • [RDTT2] RDTT2
  • Member since:
    05-05-2012

I recall after the gunner lased to the target, the gun would "jump" as the super-elevation was applied.

 

I was a driver, not a gunner on M60A3, but I do know that at certain speeds, the track bounce would be too much for the Stab to work right, but speeding up or slowing down by a couple of MPH would smooth out the system.



Blackhorse_Six_ #7 Posted Dec 12 2015 - 10:32

    Major

  • Players
  • 44159 battles
  • 10,030
  • [HHT] HHT
  • Member since:
    03-19-2011

View Postzloykrolik, on Dec 12 2015 - 01:13, said:

I recall after the gunner lased to the target, the gun would "jump" as the super-elevation was applied.

 

I was a driver, not a gunner on M60A3, but I do know that at certain speeds, the track bounce would be too much for the Stab to work right, but speeding up or slowing down by a couple of MPH would smooth out the system.

 

Yes, you're right about that.

 

If I weren't working so damn many hours, I would have come back sooner to finish the thought ...

 

The LRF return also had to be "selected" (verified, to screen-out bad returns) before the range input went into the computer ...

 

The LRF is not an integral feature of the ballistic computer because the LRF could be knocked-out in combat, forcing the circumstance of degraded gunnery. Degraded gunnery required, among a few other alternative procedures, range estimation. If the ballistic computer and/or the primary sight were damaged, the gunner would have to use the M105D telescope to engage targets. Reticles in the M105D were marked for range.



zloykrolik #8 Posted Dec 12 2015 - 23:16

    Staff sergeant

  • Players
  • 30297 battles
  • 409
  • [RDTT2] RDTT2
  • Member since:
    05-05-2012
Ah yes, the dreaded "Triple 9, 5" or when the LRF failed to get a return and displayed "9995" for the range.

Ironhand3 #9 Posted Dec 13 2015 - 21:37

    Captain

  • Players
  • 41178 battles
  • 1,428
  • [ARMG] ARMG
  • Member since:
    12-23-2011
every thing had to work in conjunction for the M60A3 to fire accurately, first you hit your ammo selection button normally heat or sabot, this introduced the characteristic of the round into the ballistic computer, then the gunner would lase the target to get the correct range but the cant unit applied elevation and the windage sensor introduced crosswind information into the system if anyone part of the system failed the tank would miss. I rode from the M60A1 to the A3 and finished my career on the M1A1 during desert storm, The 60a3 was very durable and reliable except when in hohenfels it never failed to throw a track.

Edited by Ironhand3, Dec 13 2015 - 21:46.


_FIST #10 Posted Dec 14 2015 - 05:35

    Sergeant

  • Beta Testers
  • 19628 battles
  • 185
  • [RELIC] RELIC
  • Member since:
    01-18-2011
I dont think I remember ever seeing any tracked vehicle making it one Hohenfels rotation with throwing. Had a dreaded double throw in the Carcass (our 981).

Spector668 #11 Posted Dec 14 2015 - 11:12

    Sergeant

  • Players
  • 18852 battles
  • 103
  • Member since:
    09-23-2011

At work right now, so I don't have my -10 and -20 bibles with me, but from the top of my head here's what I do remember... but to back what Blackhorse said..

 

In the case of 'normal' gunnery on a '60A3, the LRF input in the case of a single range return would be automatically input into the ballistic solution and apply superelevation to the gun. There would be a corresponding twitch to the gunners' reticle requiring the sight be re-centered on the target. This is indicative of a fire control system where the gun is slaved to the sights. If a return came back with multiple returns(usually denoted by a green bar under the range return in the gunner's sight, or the hated '9995' in the readout), the TC had the ability to review the returns and select the best one matching the tank-to-target range. A gunner who had his S^&% wired together can often tell if the return jives with what he's seeing in the sights. This is where good skills in range estimation really pay off in getting the 1st shot downrange AND that shot doing it's job....on target. 

 

​The M60 family started off utilizing a parallax coincidence range finder system identified by matching blisters on both sides of the turret, utilizing a dual-mirror system to bring two images together to find the range to the target. In the 'A3 variant, this was replaced with a ruby laser rangefinder, with the laser 'head' on the TC's side of the turret, just forward of the cupola, which mounted the God-forsaken abomination known as the M85 Tank machine Gun(the only good thing about the M85 is that it was a .50 cal weapon). Through all the 'A1 and 'A3 variants the blisters were retained in the turret designs.  Also the A3 was fitted with a true ballistic computer which would accept and process inputs from wind, cant, turret traverse, and vehicle speed...which with the Add-On-Stabilization system gave the M60A3 decent shoot-on-the-move capability. 



stalkervision #12 Posted Dec 14 2015 - 14:13

    Major

  • Players
  • 49841 battles
  • 7,829
  • Member since:
    11-12-2013
just a slight ot question here if I may be so bold. Which tanks used their coaxial mg's to furnish tracking info to the main gun? You guys seem to be the right people to ask.

Ironhand3 #13 Posted Dec 15 2015 - 04:39

    Captain

  • Players
  • 41178 battles
  • 1,428
  • [ARMG] ARMG
  • Member since:
    12-23-2011
Stalker, The only nation I ever heard of actually using that technique was israel but I believe the british actually created the technique, it has never being used on any american tanks that I have knowledge of. 

stalkervision #14 Posted Dec 15 2015 - 14:54

    Major

  • Players
  • 49841 battles
  • 7,829
  • Member since:
    11-12-2013

View PostIronhand3, on Dec 14 2015 - 22:39, said:

Stalker, The only nation I ever heard of actually using that technique was israel but I believe the british actually created the technique, it has never being used on any american tanks that I have knowledge of. 

 

Thanks I appreciate that info pal.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users