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Inside the Chieftain's Hatch: Panther


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The_Chieftain #1 Posted Jun 20 2016 - 21:18

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CapturedJoe #2 Posted Jun 20 2016 - 21:20

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Great episode again!
I was already been wondering whether the allies were using so many magneting mines to begin with at all... A pity the Germans put the stuff on many of their tanks anyway, I don't like how those surfaces look at all.

Cutthroatlemur #3 Posted Jun 20 2016 - 21:20

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Excellent!  Thanks Chieftain! 

fr0stbyt #4 Posted Jun 20 2016 - 21:27

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Such a sexy beast ;)


Edited by fr0stbyt, Jun 20 2016 - 21:28.


Colddawg #5 Posted Jun 20 2016 - 21:46

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:great::medal::popcorn:

SovietTankDestroyer #6 Posted Jun 20 2016 - 21:55

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Gimme pls

WulfeHound #7 Posted Jun 20 2016 - 23:03

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View PostCapturedJoe, on Jun 20 2016 - 15:20, said:

Great episode again!
I was already been wondering whether the allies were using so many magneting mines to begin with at all... A pity the Germans put the stuff on many of their tanks anyway, I don't like how those surfaces look at all.

 

IIRC the Allies never used magnetic AT mines operationally. I know the Japanese did (hence one of the modifications to a Stuart was covering it in spikes to keep the mine from sticking)

 

Excellent episode as always, Chieftain



Anlushac11 #8 Posted Jun 21 2016 - 00:51

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Thank You thank you thank you thank you.

 

Been waiting and hoping to see a Panther video. Love it!

 

Cant wait for interior video.


Edited by Anlushac11, Jun 21 2016 - 00:51.


Anlushac11 #9 Posted Jun 21 2016 - 01:02

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View PostCapturedJoe, on Jun 20 2016 - 15:20, said:

Great episode again!
I was already been wondering whether the allies were using so many magneting mines to begin with at all... A pity the Germans put the stuff on many of their tanks anyway, I don't like how those surfaces look at all.

 

German practice was to develop a counter to any weapons they developed, the principle if we are developing it our enemies are too.

 

Germans had their Haftholladung and so they developed a counter to it. zimmermit.

 

Allies went a differnt way. Brits had their PIAT and US had Bazooka. Russians had RPG-43.

 

As for Zimmermit being flammable it is 40% Barium Sulfate, 25% Polyvinyl Acetate (flammable) , 15% pigment, 10% zinc sulfate, and 10% sawdust (flammable). So 35% of Zimmermit is flammable compounds. Dont know if that ewould be enough to set Zimmermit on fire but that metal gets really hot when its hit.

Edited by Anlushac11, Jun 21 2016 - 08:27.


Daigensui #10 Posted Jun 21 2016 - 02:56

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This should be interesting.....

AgaresTretiak #11 Posted Jun 21 2016 - 14:58

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Great video! I'm quite excited to see part two when it comes out!

 

I can only hope we see more of these videos, they're one of the things that really make me appreciate World of Tanks over its competition.

 

I was wondering how you got up on to the engine deck on the Panther; it's a pretty big boy to clamber up.


Edited by AgaresTretiak, Jun 21 2016 - 15:00.


Redcoat #12 Posted Jun 22 2016 - 01:42

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AWESOME! Just a great episode - can't wait for the interior tour! I remember you eyeing the Panther we have in our tank park here in Ottawa a few years back Chieftain; glad you got inside one with the camera for us! :great:

FeydHarkonnen #13 Posted Jun 22 2016 - 17:29

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FYI .... Polyvinyl Acetate (PVA) is a water based adhesive polymer.  It isn't flammable 

Bonesaw1o1 #14 Posted Jun 23 2016 - 07:19

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In regards to Zimmerit flammability I thought I'd share the following, for discussion sake. Personally I think Zimmerit is one of those things that we'll never know for certain if it did or didn't work/burn but considering its relatively minor role played in the grand scheme of things I don't think that really matters.

(taken from page 62-63 of the Haynes Tiger Tank workshop manual, section written by Mike Gibb of the SdKfz Military Vehicle Foundation)

'A most gratifying by-product of our real-time experiment in reproducing Zimmerit was the dispelling of a number of myths surrounding the material. The ingredients of the paste: zinc sulphide, barium sulphate, pine saw dust, PVA, pebble dust, ochre and pine crystals dissolved in benzene had caused some concern as Zimmerit, according to many after-action reports, had reputedly caused fires to break out without the armour having been pierced. This assertion has been rejected by authorities who conducted a test of their own by firing numerous shells against a Zimmerit-coated vehicle with the inevitable result - no fire risk.
Our own experiment proved the opposite. Dissolving pine crystals in benzene requires a considerable amount of benzene. This creates an extremely sticky, clear golden-coloured liquid which, when added to the other components, assists PVA in providing the adhesive and hardening qualities in the finished product. The instructions require the use of a blow lamp held 5cm away from the surface to harden and burn off excess moisture after the first application of 2mm and then the last 4mm. [article earlier states that Zimmerit is applied in a 6mm layer] This is only to be done four hours after each after each application - allowing the Zimmerit time to dry. The fires that result from the blow lamp burn-off on the last application are significant. The surface is then painted but will not harden in a cold environment. A cold environment could almost be guaranteed in the winters of 1943-1944, not only because of mother nature, but also due to the efforts of the US 8th Air Force and RAF Bomber Command. This meant that a vehicle would leave with an, as yet, un-dried Zimmerit exterior. The paint was locked into the benzene, which had not evaporated, and the vehicle was delivered into  harms way - the battlefield. Who was telling the truth? The men on the ground or the authorities?'

As an interesting counter point I also recall reading (see link below) that when the Soviets conducted tests on captured vehicles with Zimmerit they found it to be extremely flame retardant and initially assumed that it was actually a form of anti-incendiary coating to protect against things like petrol bombs.

http://tankarchives....n-zimmerit.html

WulfeHound #15 Posted Jun 23 2016 - 07:40

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IIRC Chieftain also wrote an article about zimmerit and they found that it helped soften camouflage and make the outline of the vehicle slightly harder to identify.

The_Chieftain #16 Posted Jun 23 2016 - 08:30

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View PostWulfeHound, on Jun 23 2016 - 06:40, said:

IIRC Chieftain also wrote an article about zimmerit and they found that it helped soften camouflage and make the outline of the vehicle slightly harder to identify.

 

I don't recall such...

lightwaveTT #17 Posted Jun 23 2016 - 12:47

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Just like to say i've watched and enjoyed your videos.



stalkervision #18 Posted Jun 23 2016 - 13:56

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zimmerit was a simple logical solution to magnetic HEAT and anti tank mines that many countries could have easily developed besides Germany. One doesn't want to lose a very expensive tank to such a cheap easily produced weapon after all.

 

I could be argued the USA should have copied and used this coating in the Pacific as the Japanese had magnetic antitank mines.

 

 http://www.inert-ord.net/jap02h/grenades/t99mag/index.html

 

 



stalkervision #19 Posted Jun 23 2016 - 14:17

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 They were well aware that German magnetic antitank mines and heat devices could easily be captured, copied and use again't them.  It was a forward thinking idea actually in spite of what the critics have to say.

 

 The American's on the other hand equipped our serviceman with bazooka's before ever having a way to defeat their own device such as light steel, stand off heat detonators for tanks. The Germans immediately

 copied the bazooka and improved on it and you know the rest of the story...



WulfeHound #20 Posted Jun 23 2016 - 14:19

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View PostThe_Chieftain, on Jun 23 2016 - 02:30, said:

 

I don't recall such...

 

I may have been mistaken




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