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A Four Leaf Clover is not a Shamrock.

Event Discount St Patricks Day Four Leaf Clover Shamrock Ireland

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Mudman24 #21 Posted Mar 17 2017 - 14:47

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View Post_Gungrave_, on Mar 16 2017 - 20:12, said:

 

Kind of sad really if you get angry over a simple oversight like this I mean in the US people grow up thinking any clover leaf can be called a shamrock due to St Patricks Day.

 

Only people I see getting pissed about this are those who are Irish.

They have every right to be pissed, and they are Irish, getting pissed is sort of their thing. 



Allegra #22 Posted Mar 17 2017 - 17:29

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Not the first time WG have made an error and I dare say it will not be the last.

 

Point in question:

http://forum.worldof...the-fatherland/

 

Cheers



Sea_Star #23 Posted Mar 17 2017 - 19:33

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View Poststevezaxx, on Mar 16 2017 - 17:55, said:

 

The text has been changed to refer to the emblem you are giving away as a Quadrifoil.... that may be technically correct, but it does not really fix the PROBLEM.

The symbol of Ireland, and St Patrick, is a SHAMROCK... Let me put one of those on my tank, and THEN you can call it fixed.

 

Yeah, I agree it's not perfect. Unfortunately, I can't affect anything in-game, only the article itself, but I'll pass along your feedback so that other teams keep that in mind for next year. 

The_Chieftain #24 Posted Mar 17 2017 - 22:08

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I think part of the problem is that although clover is very common, most folks don't see shamrock except insofar as it's in pictures. As a result, absent scale, they confuse the one with the other. Shamrock is far smaller than typical clover (albeit still a type of clover). Apparently the chances of a clover being 4-leafed are one in ten thousand, so I don't see why it is impossible for there to be a four-leafed shamrock. I have never seen one, but I can't say I've ever spent a whole hell of a lot of time looking for it. Still, the point is made, shamrocks are typically three-leafed. WoWS has it correct this year.

 

Allegra, it's not common, but "Fatherland" is not incorrect in the Russian context.



Dratt_Dastardly #25 Posted Mar 17 2017 - 22:50

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Well...

Saint Patrick's color is not green either, it's blue.  Which is also Ireland's official national color.  :)



Allegra #26 Posted Mar 18 2017 - 00:15

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View PostThe_Chieftain, on Mar 18 2017 - 06:38, said:

Allegra, it's not common, but "Fatherland" is not incorrect in the Russian context.

 

            Вели́кая Оте́чественная война́ (The Great Patriotic War)

 

While it is true that отечество / отчизна (Note: отчизна is actually a feminine noun) can be referred to as fatherland this can also mean homeland, old country, or native land depending on the context.

 

However, родина (ancestral land, motherland, mother country) is far more common and has connotations ‘of being emotionally attached to it.’ (Understanding Cultures Through Their Key Words, 1997)

 

Historically the feminine address for Russia predates the male – certainly dating back to 1595 when it was referred to as the ‘Mother country’.

 

On June 22 1941, Sergii Stragorodskii, the locum tenens of the Russian Orthodox Church wrote in a letter to his Pastors and Parishioners, part of which states: ‘the Church of Christ confers it’s blessing on all Orthodox believers in their defence of the holy borders of our Motherland’.

 

Родина-мать зовёт! - the statue founded to commemorate the Battle of Stalingrad - can literally be translated as: ‘Homeland-Mother Calls’ or the Motherland Calls.

 

The famous propaganda poster (and all it’s iterations) by Irakli Toidze in 1941 is titled: Родина-Мать зовет! (see above).

 

Cheers  

 

Edit: Forgot the title :)

 


Edited by Allegra, Mar 18 2017 - 00:52.


dunniteowl #27 Posted Mar 18 2017 - 00:27

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Sure 'an' Begorrah, were do ye tink Ay got the feerst pert of me neme?  Ye kin refer ta may as Yer Lairdship.

 

Ay sapart dis mayssage.


 

[just do your best to pretend that's a phonetic stereotypical bad Irish accent and you should get by]


 

GL, HF & HSYBF

Mullac A Bu!



FrozenKemp #28 Posted Mar 18 2017 - 00:37

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After seeing the Irish Army's insignia in the Chieftain's recent video, it would be great to be able to get that as insignia!

dunniteowl #29 Posted Mar 18 2017 - 01:11

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Oddly enough, about fifteen minutes ago, I did win the Irish Emblem.  It's on my Bishop right now.

 

GL, HF & HSYBF



9thDoctorWhooves #30 Posted Mar 18 2017 - 04:07

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View PostDratt_Dastardly, on Mar 17 2017 - 13:50, said:

Well...

Saint Patrick's color is not green either, it's blue.  Which is also Ireland's official national color.  :)

 

This is why the Shamrock and the color green are so important to the Republic of Ireland. 

 

 

Wikipedia 

"The colour green has been associated with Ireland since at least the 1640s, when the green harp flag was used by the Irish Catholic Confederation. Green ribbons and shamrocks have been worn on St Patrick's Day since at least the 1680s. The Friendly Brothers of St Patrick, an Irish fraternity founded in about 1750, adopted green as its colour. However, when the Order of St. Patrick—an Anglo-Irish chivalric order—was founded in 1783 it adopted blue as its colour, which led to blue being associated with St Patrick. During the 1790s, green would become associated with Irish nationalism, due to its use by the United Irishmen. This was a republican organisation—led mostly by Protestants but with many Catholic members—who launched a rebellion in 1798 against British rule. The phrase "wearing of the green" comes from a song of the same name, which laments United Irishmen supporters being persecuted for wearing green. Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, the colour green and its association with St Patrick's Day grew."

 

As you can see the color blue was brought to Ireland by the British and was first associated with St. Patrick in 1783. "The Order of St. Patrick" was established by the British, not the Irish. So, technically the color green has been associated with Ireland and St. Patrick far longer then the color blue.  

 



mumblecorefilms #31 Posted Mar 18 2017 - 13:10

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lol, funny, its wot, they can't even grasp a time change in n.a. tbh, i was hoping for a leprechaun emblem this year...

Edited by mumblecorefilms, Mar 18 2017 - 13:12.


Ed_the_Baker #32 Posted Mar 18 2017 - 17:21

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if i recall correctly it was Henry VIII, the sassenach king who started the blue color for Ireland, he  made up a  blue flag with the Irish harp, as the representation of Ireland in his court....

 



Rawrlynn #33 Posted Mar 19 2017 - 00:46

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View Post9thDoctorWhooves, on Mar 17 2017 - 05:10, said:

 

I agree, the name is now correct, but they are still using it to symbolize St. Patrick's Day. So, they only fixed part of the issue. But, it's a start.   

 

that can be for the one next year a proper shamrock for people that get angry over silly things.  

 

I know my heritage and if people think one way... let them... just smile behind their backs because you know for fact they are wrong. 



stevezaxx #34 Posted Mar 19 2017 - 03:18

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just leaving this here incase someone dislikes the color Green:
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qqs4EbU02As

 



Duqe #35 Posted Mar 19 2017 - 16:39

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View PostCutthroatlemur, on Mar 16 2017 - 23:50, said:

All my +1s OP

 

being Irish by descent as well as a Patrick, this is near and dear to my heart

 

Isn't saying being Irish by descent in the US kind of like saying it's likely for Europeans to have relative ancestry to Charlemange? Or for Slavic peoples to share a distant lineage with Genghis Khan.

OrnmiIler #36 Posted Mar 20 2017 - 02:37

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View PostThe_Chieftain, on Mar 17 2017 - 16:08, said:

I think part of the problem is that although clover is very common, most folks don't see shamrock except insofar as it's in pictures. As a result, absent scale, they confuse the one with the other. Shamrock is far smaller than typical clover (albeit still a type of clover). Apparently the chances of a clover being 4-leafed are one in ten thousand, so I don't see why it is impossible for there to be a four-leafed shamrock. I have never seen one, but I can't say I've ever spent a whole hell of a lot of time looking for it. Still, the point is made, shamrocks are typically three-leafed. WoWS has it correct this year.

 

Allegra, it's not common, but "Fatherland" is not incorrect in the Russian context.

 

 

Note see: Shamrock Survey

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shamrock

Botanical Name

Common Name

Percentage (1893)

Percentage (1988)

Trifolium dubium

Lesser Clover

51

46

Trifolium repens

White Clover

34

35

Trifolium pratense

Red Clover

6

4

Medicago lupulina

Black Medick

6

7

Oxalis acetosella

Wood Sorrel

_

3

Others

various Trifolium spp., Oxalis spp.

3

5

The results show that there is no one "true" species of shamrock, but that Trifolium dubium (Lesser clover) is considered to be the shamrock by roughly half of Irish people, and Trifolium repens (White clover) by another third, with the remaining fifth split between Trifolium pratense, Medicago lupulina, Oxalis acetosella and various other species of Trifolium and Oxalis. None of the species in the survey are unique to Ireland, and all are common European species, so there is no botanical basis for the widespread belief that the shamrock is a unique species of plant that only grows in Ireland.

 

May everyone be granted a happy and blessed spirit of green solidarity forever in commemoration of Saint Patrick, this great holy interlocutor between God and Man.

 

 






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