Jump to content


Windows User Alert


  • Please log in to reply
79 replies to this topic

Klaatu_Nicto #61 Posted May 16 2017 - 20:44

    Major

  • Players
  • 43956 battles
  • 7,136
  • Member since:
    09-21-2012

We did more than just create a power vacuum in Iraq. If Western governments, Canada inlcuded,  would grow a backbone and just say to no to the U.S that would go a long way in stabilizing the world. 

 

I have some more mining to do in Skyrim then I'll be ready to end their civil war - in my favor.   :)



RF_Van #62 Posted May 16 2017 - 21:02

    Captain

  • Players
  • 9765 battles
  • 1,451
  • Member since:
    04-13-2013

View PostLethalhavoc, on May 16 2017 - 10:18, said:

 

You are free to disagree with me, we're Canadian after all.

 

Yes, we disagree....on that much we can agree.

Klaatu_Nicto #63 Posted May 17 2017 - 17:47

    Major

  • Players
  • 43956 battles
  • 7,136
  • Member since:
    09-21-2012

Hacker group that leaked NSA spy tools likely includes a U.S. insider, experts say

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/nation-world/national/national-security/article150827507.html



Klaatu_Nicto #64 Posted May 17 2017 - 18:08

    Major

  • Players
  • 43956 battles
  • 7,136
  • Member since:
    09-21-2012

This is also what I called (for some years now) a swindle of the tax payers. First, they find or create weaknesses then they don’t fix these weaknesses so we are all vulnerable to attack. Then, when attacks occur, they say they need more money for cyber security — a total swindle!

 

This is only the second swindle of the public. The first was terror efforts by saying we need to collect everything to stop terror — another lie. They said that because to collect everything takes lots and lots of money.

 

Then, when the terror attack occurs, they say they need more money, people and data to stop terror. Another swindle from the start.

 

And, finally, the latest swindle “THE RUSSIANS DID IT.” This is an effort to start a new cold war which means another bigger swindle of US tax payers.

 

- Bill Binney,  NSA executive who created the agency’s mass surveillance program for digital information, who served as the senior technical director within the agency, who managed six thousand NSA employees, the 36-year NSA veteran widely regarded as a “legend” within the agency and the NSA’s best-ever analyst and code-breaker.

 

 

Always a patriot: Computer Weekly talks to Bill Binney, the senior NSA official who blew the whistle before Edward Snowden
http://www.computerweekly.com/feature/Interview-the-original-NSA-whistleblower



Gothraul #65 Posted May 17 2017 - 20:14

    Major

  • -Players-
  • 1526 battles
  • 3,127
  • Member since:
    11-17-2014

View PostKlaatu_Nicto, on May 16 2017 - 20:44, said:

We did more than just create a power vacuum in Iraq. If Western governments, Canada inlcuded,  would grow a backbone and just say to no to the U.S that would go a long way in stabilizing the world. 

 

I have some more mining to do in Skyrim then I'll be ready to end their civil war - in my favor.   :)

 

You must be behind the times as the west has been in decline for decades and the only thing propping that up is the casino economy while the poor in this country spill their blood for monopoly corporations who bought out western governments generations ago. Smoke and mirrors while the powers that be behind the curtain control nearly everything and the masses are oblivious. Going to be fun when the hard push comes for global this and global that until there isn't much left.

Edited by Gothraul, May 17 2017 - 20:15.


Klaatu_Nicto #66 Posted May 17 2017 - 22:43

    Major

  • Players
  • 43956 battles
  • 7,136
  • Member since:
    09-21-2012

View Postriff_, on May 16 2017 - 11:33, said:

 

Is not this for the other thread?  :)

 

If the U.S does not build a wall on it's northern border to stop the flood of refugees fleeing the advancing glaciers Americans will be seeing this on their streets. 

 

Spoiler

 

Build the wall now before it's too late.


Edited by Klaatu_Nicto, May 17 2017 - 22:45.


Lethalhavoc #67 Posted May 18 2017 - 20:15

    Major

  • Players
  • 37986 battles
  • 9,996
  • Member since:
    01-18-2013
On an interesting note, the Windows patch to plug the Wannacry virus was released yesterday. 

Gothraul #68 Posted May 19 2017 - 01:40

    Major

  • -Players-
  • 1526 battles
  • 3,127
  • Member since:
    11-17-2014

View PostLethalhavoc, on May 18 2017 - 20:15, said:

On an interesting note, the Windows patch to plug the Wannacry virus was released yesterday. 

 

M$ even rolled out an update for Windows XP :amazed:

Klaatu_Nicto #69 Posted May 19 2017 - 05:34

    Major

  • Players
  • 43956 battles
  • 7,136
  • Member since:
    09-21-2012
Every month since I started using Windows I get updates to fix security flaws. Does this happen with other OS's?

Lethalhavoc #70 Posted May 19 2017 - 18:00

    Major

  • Players
  • 37986 battles
  • 9,996
  • Member since:
    01-18-2013

View PostGothraul, on May 18 2017 - 20:40, said:

 

M$ even rolled out an update for Windows XP :amazed:

 

XP is the most effected OS, since it was no longer supported by MS, but is still in common use for many institutions.

 

View PostKlaatu_Nicto, on May 19 2017 - 00:34, said:

Every month since I started using Windows I get updates to fix security flaws. Does this happen with other OS's?

 

Windows OS's are fundamentally flawed due to the registry part of the operating system.

Apples are less effected, as for Linux etc, i'm unsure since i have never used them.



Markd73 #71 Posted Jun 08 2017 - 22:23

    Major

  • Players
  • 28621 battles
  • 3,525
  • [AOS] AOS
  • Member since:
    04-20-2011

View PostKlaatu_Nicto, on May 15 2017 - 19:22, said:

The more the U.S. government gets involved in healthcare the worse things get.

 

The U.S. “health care cost crisis” didn’t start until 1965. The government increased demand with the passage of Medicare and Medicaid while restricting the supply of doctors and hospitals. Health care prices responded at twice the rate of inflation (Figure 1). Now, the U.S. is repeating the same mistakes.

https://mises.org/blog/how-government-regulations-made-healthcare-so-expensive

 

This is enough serious talk for me this morning. Time to get back to Skyrim. After I downloaded my games on Steam from the Cloud to my new computer and clicked on the Skyrim Script Extender I discovered none of my saved games were there. I was a bit upset until I realized that was not the Skyrim Script Extender I had clicked. It was the Skyrim Special Edition so I started over and now have over 2000 each of creep cluster and scaly pholiota so I have a bunch of leveling up to do with my alchemy lab. I'm near level 30 now and have not notified the Yarl of Whiterun about the dragon attack at Helgen so no pesky dragons bothering me yet. Is it my imagination or did Bethesda in their Special Edition give all the gals in Skyrim breast implants?

 

If only some kind of non-partisan data that normalizes and compares the health outcomes to dollars spent in different countries. 

 

Oh wait a bunch of non-partisan groups and people already do that.

https://ourworldinda...ending-us-focus

https://www.oecd.org...ending-2015.pdf

 

Darn I hate impartial data when it runs counter to my pre-existing narrative. Funny how the US system is not even in the top 5 for health outcomes to dollars spent. I guess if you are rich then you get great healthcare, but not so much for everyone else.

 


Edited by Markd73, Jun 08 2017 - 22:26.


Klaatu_Nicto #72 Posted Jun 08 2017 - 22:47

    Major

  • Players
  • 43956 battles
  • 7,136
  • Member since:
    09-21-2012

View PostMarkd73, on Jun 08 2017 - 13:23, said:

 

If only some kind of non-partisan data that normalizes and compares the health outcomes to dollars spent in different countries. 

 

Oh wait a bunch of non-partisan groups and people already do that.

https://ourworldinda...ending-us-focus

https://www.oecd.org...ending-2015.pdf

 

Darn I hate impartial data when it runs counter to my pre-existing narrative. Funny how the US system is not even in the top 5 for health outcomes to dollars spent. I guess if you are rich then you get great healthcare, but not so much for everyone else.

 

 

You can thank the government for that.  The fix is simple - a free market for the medical care industry.

 

Something I posted on a forum somewhere back in 2009.............

 

Introducing the HMO hearings, Kennedy said,"We need legislation which reorganizes the system to guarantee a sufficient volume of high quality medical care, distributed equitably across the country and available at reasonable cost to every American. It is going to take a drastic overhaul of our entire way of doing business in the health-care field in order to solve the financing and organizational aspects of our health crisis. One aspect of that solution is the creation of comprehensive systems of health-care delivery."3

 

On December 29, 1973, President Nixon signed the HMO Act of 1973 into law.
 
As patients have since discovered,the HMO--staffed by physicians employed by and beholden to corporations--was not much of a Christmas present or an insurance product. It promises coverage but often denies access. The HMO, like other prepaid MCOs, requires enrollees to pay in advance for a long list of routine and major medical benefits, whether the health-care services are needed, wanted, or ever used. The HMOs are then allowed to manage care--withhold access to dollars and service--through definitions of medical necessity, restrictive drug formularies, and HMO-approved clinical guidelines. As a result, HMOs can keep millions of dollars from premium-paying patients.

 

Congress's plan to save its members' political skins and national agendas relied on employer-sponsored coverage and taxpayer subsidies to HMOs. The planners' long-range goal was to place Medicare and Medicaid recipients into managed care where HMO managers, instead of Congress, could ration care and the government's financial liability could be limited through capitation (a fixed payment per enrollee per month regardless of the expense incurred by the HMO).
 
To accomplish this goal, public officials had to ensure that HMOs developed the size and stability necessary to take on the financial risks of capitated government health-care programs. This required that HMOs capture a significant portion of the private insurance market. Once Medicare and Medicaid recipients began to enroll in HMOs, the organizations would have the flexibility to pool their resources, redistribute private premium dollars, and ration care across their patient populations.
 
Using the HMO Act of 1973, Congress eliminated three major barriers to HMO growth, as clarified by U.S. Representative Claude Pepper of Florida: "First, HMO's are expensive to start; second, restrictive State laws often make the operation of HMO's illegal; and, third, HMO's cannot compete effectively in employer health benefit plans with existing private insurance programs. The third factor occurs because HMO premiums are often greater than those for an insurance plan." 9
 
To bring the privately insured into HMOs, Congress forced employers with 25 or more employees to offer HMOs as an option--a law that remained in effect until 1995. Congress then provided a total of $375 million in federal subsidies to fund planning and start-up expenses, and to lower the cost of HMO premiums. This allowed HMOs to undercut the premium prices of their insurance competitors and gain significant market share.
 
In addition, the federal law pre-empted state laws, that prohibited physicians from receiving payments for not providing care. In other words, payments to physicians by HMOs for certain behavior (fewer admissions to hospitals, rationing care, prescribing cheaper medicines) were now legal.....

 

Truth be told, HMOs allowed politicians to promise access to comprehensive health-care services without actually delivering them. Because treatment decisions could not be linked directly to Congress, HMOs provided the perfect cover for its plans to contain costs nationwide through health-care rationing. Now that citizens are angry with managed (rationed) care, the responsible parties in Congress, Senator Kennedy in particular, return with legislation ostensibly to protect patients from the HMOs they instituted.


http://www.cchconlin...acy/hmoart.php3


Edited by Klaatu_Nicto, Jun 08 2017 - 23:01.


Markd73 #73 Posted Jun 09 2017 - 01:08

    Major

  • Players
  • 28621 battles
  • 3,525
  • [AOS] AOS
  • Member since:
    04-20-2011

View PostKlaatu_Nicto, on Jun 08 2017 - 21:47, said:

 

You can thank the government for that.  The fix is simple - a free market for the medical care industry.

 

Something I posted on a forum somewhere back in 2009.............

 

Introducing the HMO hearings, Kennedy said,"We need legislation which reorganizes the system to guarantee a sufficient volume of high quality medical care, distributed equitably across the country and available at reasonable cost to every American. It is going to take a drastic overhaul of our entire way of doing business in the health-care field in order to solve the financing and organizational aspects of our health crisis. One aspect of that solution is the creation of comprehensive systems of health-care delivery."3

 

On December 29, 1973, President Nixon signed the HMO Act of 1973 into law.
 
As patients have since discovered,the HMO--staffed by physicians employed by and beholden to corporations--was not much of a Christmas present or an insurance product. It promises coverage but often denies access. The HMO, like other prepaid MCOs, requires enrollees to pay in advance for a long list of routine and major medical benefits, whether the health-care services are needed, wanted, or ever used. The HMOs are then allowed to manage care--withhold access to dollars and service--through definitions of medical necessity, restrictive drug formularies, and HMO-approved clinical guidelines. As a result, HMOs can keep millions of dollars from premium-paying patients.

 

Congress's plan to save its members' political skins and national agendas relied on employer-sponsored coverage and taxpayer subsidies to HMOs. The planners' long-range goal was to place Medicare and Medicaid recipients into managed care where HMO managers, instead of Congress, could ration care and the government's financial liability could be limited through capitation (a fixed payment per enrollee per month regardless of the expense incurred by the HMO).
 
To accomplish this goal, public officials had to ensure that HMOs developed the size and stability necessary to take on the financial risks of capitated government health-care programs. This required that HMOs capture a significant portion of the private insurance market. Once Medicare and Medicaid recipients began to enroll in HMOs, the organizations would have the flexibility to pool their resources, redistribute private premium dollars, and ration care across their patient populations.
 
Using the HMO Act of 1973, Congress eliminated three major barriers to HMO growth, as clarified by U.S. Representative Claude Pepper of Florida: "First, HMO's are expensive to start; second, restrictive State laws often make the operation of HMO's illegal; and, third, HMO's cannot compete effectively in employer health benefit plans with existing private insurance programs. The third factor occurs because HMO premiums are often greater than those for an insurance plan." 9
 
To bring the privately insured into HMOs, Congress forced employers with 25 or more employees to offer HMOs as an option--a law that remained in effect until 1995. Congress then provided a total of $375 million in federal subsidies to fund planning and start-up expenses, and to lower the cost of HMO premiums. This allowed HMOs to undercut the premium prices of their insurance competitors and gain significant market share.
 
In addition, the federal law pre-empted state laws, that prohibited physicians from receiving payments for not providing care. In other words, payments to physicians by HMOs for certain behavior (fewer admissions to hospitals, rationing care, prescribing cheaper medicines) were now legal.....

 

Truth be told, HMOs allowed politicians to promise access to comprehensive health-care services without actually delivering them. Because treatment decisions could not be linked directly to Congress, HMOs provided the perfect cover for its plans to contain costs nationwide through health-care rationing. Now that citizens are angry with managed (rationed) care, the responsible parties in Congress, Senator Kennedy in particular, return with legislation ostensibly to protect patients from the HMOs they instituted.


http://www.cchconlin...acy/hmoart.php3

 

Let me take a guess - you didn't look at the links that I sent you. All of the health systems that had highest value (health outcomes relative to dollars spent) were at their core a single payer government run healthcare systems. 

 

I am not against the private market playing a part, as a blended model is quite effective in some of the better performing countries listed. They all share one thing different from the US. The predominate healthcare services payer was the government, and everyone from the poorest to the richest had access to this system without having to buy their own healthcare insurance.

 

Damn I hate when "socialism" outperforms capitalism.



Klaatu_Nicto #74 Posted Jun 09 2017 - 01:39

    Major

  • Players
  • 43956 battles
  • 7,136
  • Member since:
    09-21-2012

View PostMarkd73, on Jun 08 2017 - 16:08, said:

 

Let me take a guess - you didn't look at the links that I sent you. All of the health systems that had highest value (health outcomes relative to dollars spent) were at their core a single payer government run healthcare systems. 

 

I am not against the private market playing a part, as a blended model is quite effective in some of the better performing countries listed. They all share one thing different from the US. The predominate healthcare services payer was the government, and everyone from the poorest to the richest had access to this system without having to buy their own healthcare insurance.

 

Damn I hate when "socialism" outperforms capitalism.

 

We don't have a capitalist healthcare system in the U.S. We have system heavily controlled by a government greatly influenced by special interest groups.  

 

From the article I posted here on May 15th:

 

Today, the U.S. and Canada have less than 25 doctors and 30 hospital beds (per 10,000 population), compared to over 35 and 50, respectively, in most countries in continental Western Europe.

 

Mark Pearson, head of Division on Health Policy at The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), discussed possible reasons the U.S. spends more than two-and-a-half times per person more than most developed nations in the world, including relatively rich European countries: “The U.S. has fewer physicians and fewer physician consultations relative to its population. The U.S. also has fewer hospital beds for its population size and shorter average stays in hospital relative to other countries. Indeed, the lower numbers of physicians could help explain why they cost more; there is less competition for patients.” He adds that universities in other countries are still able to attract the best students to medicine (Kane 2012).
 

The U.S. health-care market appears to behave according to laws of supply and demand (at least until the 1980s). Assuming government subsidy of the elderly and poor serves the public good, the cause of the “U.S. health care cost crisis” appears to be that government didn’t allow the supply of doctors and hospitals to respond to increased consumer demands. Politicians from both major political parties created a self-fulfilling prophesy by assuming markets couldn’t work in health care.

 

The obvious solution is to increase the supply of physicians and hospitals to meet demand. Unfortunately, if medical schools doubled their class sizes by next year, it could still take over 20 years to achieve the number of doctors relative to population found in continental Western Europe. Competition could be achieved quicker by relaxing the licensing requirements placed on para-medicals (e.g., nurses), and possibly also foreign educated doctors, to compete with U.S. physicians to the degree to which they are qualified.

https://mises.org/blog/how-government-regulations-made-healthcare-so-expensive

 

 



tod914 #75 Posted Jun 09 2017 - 05:17

    Major

  • Players
  • 50749 battles
  • 2,071
  • [RDNKS] RDNKS
  • Member since:
    12-23-2013

View PostKlaatu_Nicto, on May 16 2017 - 13:03, said:

Is this imaginary?

 

 

 

 

Let's see.  Young Muslim men of able fighting age whom want to impose Sharia Law on a Country that took them in.  Send them back to their country of origin, hand them a rifle and tell them to pick a side.



120mm_he #76 Posted Jun 09 2017 - 18:09

    Major

  • Players
  • 13813 battles
  • 15,511
  • [PBS] PBS
  • Member since:
    02-17-2011

View Posttod914, on Jun 08 2017 - 23:17, said:

 

Let's see.  Young Muslim men of able fighting age whom want to impose Sharia Law on a Country that took them in.  Send them back to their country of origin, hand them a rifle and tell them to pick a side.

 

Racist islamaphobic xenophobic bigot. How dare you not bend the knee and offer up your neck for the poor migrants who want nothing to do with your culture and way of life?

 

Oh yeah its almost all fighting age male migrants as the refugees which might have the odd family unit are actually just a tiny portion of the invasion.

 

Witness the sea invasion.

 



tod914 #77 Posted Jun 09 2017 - 19:33

    Major

  • Players
  • 50749 battles
  • 2,071
  • [RDNKS] RDNKS
  • Member since:
    12-23-2013

Considering the US and it's allies was instrumental in creating that mass exodus, I feel that we should offer assistance to those in need.  That would include families, elderly, and children irregardless of faith.  Those of whom want to impose their ideology (Sharia Law), do not belong.  They will not assimilate well into the hosting nation, and will only be a problem. 

 



120mm_he #78 Posted Jun 09 2017 - 20:48

    Major

  • Players
  • 13813 battles
  • 15,511
  • [PBS] PBS
  • Member since:
    02-17-2011

View Posttod914, on Jun 09 2017 - 13:33, said:

Considering the US and it's allies was instrumental in creating that mass exodus, I feel that we should offer assistance to those in need.  That would include families, elderly, and children irregardless of faith.  Those of whom want to impose their ideology (Sharia Law), do not belong.  They will not assimilate well into the hosting nation, and will only be a problem. 

 

 

This is false. The percentage of actual war refugees coming into the eu is tiny compared to the mass exodus of fighting age males leaving their countries to hop on the gravy train of welfare benefits the eu is handing out like candy. Those africans in the vid I linked are not refugees they are being recruited by western corporations and put on rafts which are towed out to the 12 mile limit where italian ships come to pick them up and ferry them to italy.

 

Do these look like family units come to settle into a new life in the west to get away from war? No, this is a straight up invasion and the eu is doing it to themselves for some lunatic reason.

 

 

 



Klaatu_Nicto #79 Posted Jun 22 2017 - 18:21

    Major

  • Players
  • 43956 battles
  • 7,136
  • Member since:
    09-21-2012

A Cyberattack ‘the World Isn’t Ready For’

 

Sean Dillon, a senior analyst at RiskSense, a New Mexico security company, was among the first security researchers to scan the internet for the N.S.A.’s DoublePulsar tool. He found tens of thousands of host computers are infected with the tool, which attackers can use at will.....More distressing, Mr. Dillon tested all the major antivirus products against the DoublePulsar infection and a demoralizing 99 percent failed to detect it.

 

https://www.nytimes....berweapons.html



Klaatu_Nicto #80 Posted Jun 23 2017 - 07:51

    Major

  • Players
  • 43956 battles
  • 7,136
  • Member since:
    09-21-2012





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users