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Russians and 'jerrycans' in WWII


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Lert #1 Posted Oct 31 2017 - 18:37

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Did the Russians have 'jerrycans' during early war?  Specifically, early WWII. 1939 ~ 1941 era. Perhaps cans of own design? And, if so, of what design were they? Perhaps captured cans?

 

The reason I'm asking is because I have a few spare 1/16th scale jerrycans and I'm working on a 1/16th scale KV-2 and I'm wondering if it would be appropriate to put a few of them on the tank. They're generic, unlabeled cans of the following design:

 

 

 



Yankee #2 Posted Oct 31 2017 - 18:58

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From a brief bit of research it sure seems they favored the cylinder designs we are used to seeing in game

But it’s your model, and it a reasonable assumption they could salvage German equipment or Lend lease

Lonewolfpj #3 Posted Oct 31 2017 - 19:02

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American style lend lease cans were common. I would send you a photo of a Red Army Marshaling area if I can can find the old thing.

Da_Craw #4 Posted Oct 31 2017 - 19:24

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They certainly adopted the design at some point.  I didn't see any reference to when, though. Sadly, one of the results on the first page of googling the question is this forum thread. 

Lert #5 Posted Oct 31 2017 - 19:28

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View PostYankee, on Oct 31 2017 - 17:58, said:

From a brief bit of research it sure seems they favored the cylinder designs we are used to seeing in game

But it’s your model, and it a reasonable assumption they could salvage German equipment or Lend lease

 

I just want to try to make it a realistic 'what if' tank, and if the answer remains 'maybe' then I'm just going to leave them off and be happy with a few tarp rolls and a crate on its fenders.

 

View PostLonewolfpj, on Oct 31 2017 - 18:02, said:

American style lend lease cans were common. I would send you a photo of a Red Army Marshaling area if I can can find the old thing.

 

US style jerrycans were a different style though. They had a cross on the sides instead of the - ... Well, the design in my OP. That said, the british cans of WWII looked very similar, almost identical to the ones I have. Hmmmmm ...

 

View PostDa_Craw, on Oct 31 2017 - 18:24, said:

They certainly adopted the design at some point.  I didn't see any reference to when, though. Sadly, one of the results on the first page of googling the question is this forum thread. 

 

At some point, yes. Which is the issue - my tank is an early war one.

Edited by Lert, Oct 31 2017 - 19:29.


Da_Craw #6 Posted Oct 31 2017 - 20:17

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http://beutepanzer.r...v-2/kv_2_87.JPG

 

Is that a jerrycan on its side on the left side of the pic?  I have seen a few of these  KV-2 pics that look like they might have a jerrycan on them.  They are all captured tanks, though.  

 

EDIT: found this one, but it is not clear if those are jerrycans.

 

http://4.bp.blogspot...nfanteria+2.jpg


Edited by Da_Craw, Oct 31 2017 - 20:19.


Lert #7 Posted Oct 31 2017 - 20:20

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View PostDa_Craw, on Oct 31 2017 - 19:17, said:

Is that a jerrycan on its side on the left side of the pic? 

 

I don't think so.

 

View PostDa_Craw, on Oct 31 2017 - 19:17, said:

hey are all captured tanks, though.

 

Yeah, germans would be sure to put jerrycans on captured vehicles, that doesn't mean the original crew did.



Da_Craw #8 Posted Oct 31 2017 - 20:24

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View PostLert, on Oct 31 2017 - 13:20, said:

 

I don't think so.

 

 

Yeah, germans would be sure to put jerrycans on captured vehicles, that doesn't mean the original crew did.

 

I don't suppose you are doing a "planned invasion of Malta" theme?  I saw a pic of a captured KV-2 being prepped for use in that non-operation.  It was probably gray, though....  

Almighty_Johnson #9 Posted Oct 31 2017 - 20:51

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View PostLonewolfpj, on Oct 31 2017 - 13:02, said:

American style lend lease cans were common. I would send you a photo of a Red Army Marshaling area if I can can find the old thing.

 

All armies on the Eastern Front had a habit of using captured equipment.  There are literally tons of photos of Germans in Russian gear, Russians in German kit, and Finns using both.  I did WW2 historical reenactment for a long time as a Soviet and a large portion of equipment was US Lend Lease, German Capture, or Soviet made.  Many soviet items were clones of German items.

You can safely use US style Jerry Cans on a Soviet model and not have it be out of place.  It would actually add a touch or realism.



Isola_di_Fano #10 Posted Oct 31 2017 - 21:00

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Hi OP,

 

The jerry can you posted seems to be of german origin

 Americans generally seem to have an X on the side (as did some German models), those with the design you posted are usually of German origin

http://histomil.com/viewtopic.php?t=9019

 

Following link has pretty much all anyone need to know on German cans  http://sdkfz7.free.fr/

They were in service in Germany from 1936 onward, and the link has somes pictures for customization

 

They were also copied in the Soviet bloc after the war it seems

http://g503.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=110752

 

You can safely assumes some of the German cans were ''commissioned'' by the Soviets as early as September 41 in some counter-offensives in between Moscow and Leningrad.

I would have no issue putting those on a Russian tank from late 41 onward.


Edited by Isola_di_Fano, Oct 31 2017 - 21:05.


Isola_di_Fano #11 Posted Oct 31 2017 - 21:27

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I forgot.

This site has some interesting pics, not very detailed but can be interesting for camo amongst other things  http://www.tanks-encyclopedia.com/ww2/soviet/soviet_KV-2.php

 

 



ironcladtanker #12 Posted Mar 02 2018 - 16:31

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---Off Topic---

BTW, I think the Germans invented the Jerry can.....



Beausabre #13 Posted May 08 2019 - 15:25

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"BTW, I think the Germans invented the Jerry can.....


 

 

 

That's why it's called a "Jerry Can" - "Jerry" was a nickname for "German"


 

More than you ever wanted to know about the subject


 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerrycan#British_necessity


 

BTW Squared - the original British equivalent was known as a "Flimsy", which tells you why it was notorious for leaking.


 

The flimsy, officially known as the Petrol, Oil and Water can, was a World War II petrol container used by the British Army. They held 4 imperial gallons (18 l; 4.8 US gal) of fuel, which allowed them to be moved by a single person.[1][2]

The flimsy was well known for leaking; when used in the North African Campaign, some flimsies leaked 20%, and in some cases over 50% of the fuel they carried over a journey.[3][4] One quartermaster reported that his 70,000 imperial gallons (320,000 l; 84,000 US gal) of fuel had been reduced to just 30,000 over the journey - and was informed that even this was a "good effort".[5]

The problem with the containers was the crimped or soldered seams, which easily split during transportation, especially over the rocky desert terrain in North Africa.[1] Containers were stacked on top of each other during shipping, and the upper layers crushed those below, resulting in fuel flowing freely in the bilges, with the resulting poisoning and fire risks.[2]

The favoured use by soldiers for the flimsy was as a small stove which could be used to heat meals and tea for the crews.[4] A soldier would cut the flimsy in half, fill the bottom half with petrol-soaked sand and balance the other half on top, filled with water. This was known as a Benghazi Boiler or Benghazi Burner, after the embattled town of Benghazi.[2]

Both 4 gallon flimsies and the original 2 gallon cans were replaced by the jerrycan,[when?] copied from the much better German design of fuel container.


 

When they discovered it in the Desert, the "Jerry Can" name was born and they became a prized trophy.


 

Don't forget to stencil them "Water" and "Gas/Petrol/Diesel" as appropriate (if I remember correctly the Germans painted an X on their water cans...)



FrozenKemp #14 Posted May 08 2019 - 16:02

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All true, but I think the Russians would had few if any British or American cans by the end of 1941. :-/

Edited by FrozenKemp, May 08 2019 - 16:03.


Beausabre #15 Posted May 26 2019 - 18:26

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Here is an Osprey illustration of a pair of RAC members sharing their "brew up" with a Gurkha Rifleman in the Desert, courtesy of a flimsy converted to a "Benghazi Boiler". A brew up was a sacred ritual in the Eighth Army and the Commonwealth Armies as a whole. Recipe - tea as hot and strong as possible, several lumps of sugar saved from ration packs and condensed milk (which happens to be sweet itself). Hot and plenty of sugar for a revitalized body - think 1940's energy drink.

https://www.steve-noon.co.uk/photo_9383160.html

AND here's a reenactor brewing up https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iouyDTP800

Hey Chieftain, does the Irish Army follow the same customs ?

I had read about cooking with gasoline / petrol in a book about the 8th Army I read in high school. And when I had a vehicle of my own, I had hot C-rations out in the field. Take an empty C-ration can, pour a little gas from the Jerry Can into it, pour in sand or dirt to absorb the gas, light with a C-Ration match, place can of C-Rats on top (opening the lid first, of course), heat to taste. I called it a "desert cooker" and the idea caught on in my unit. When C-rats were replaced by MRE's, I got a multi-fuel (Gas, Diesel. White Gas, Kerosene, if it was liquid and could burn, it was fuel - and it ensured no matter where I was or with who, I always had a hot meal) Optimus folding stove that would fit in my rucksack.

https://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/used-swedish-military-optimus-stove?a=713482

Anyway, if you are in the military, I highly recommend them, you can get military surplus or new

https://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/optimus-hiker-backpacking-stove?a=1710659


 

.



Beausabre #16 Posted May 27 2019 - 09:23

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Forgot to mention, it is Optimus Model 8R






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