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Klaatu_Nicto #1 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 20:36

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At least 17 earthquakes hit near Mount St. Helens
Updated: Jan 3, 2018 - 9:19 AM
http://www.kiro7.com...orton/674905477

 



Mr_BushyBeard #2 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 20:47

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Not so much. 

https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/cvo/

"There is no sign that this is connected to volcanic activity."



Klaatu_Nicto #3 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 21:05

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Pacific Northwest Sesmic Network
https://pnsn.org/

Klaatu_Nicto #4 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 21:08

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View PostA_U_G_U_S_T_U_S, on Jan 03 2018 - 11:47, said:

Not so much. 

https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/cvo/

"There is no sign that this is connected to volcanic activity."

 

A series of quakes that close to a magma chamber is a good reason to stay alert to what's going on there. Activity in the magma chamber could also cause stress on the local faults.

 

Earthquake activity at Mount St. Helens was not monitored by seismologists until seismometers were installed near the volcano in 1972. From January 1975 through early 1980 only 44 earthquakes were located within 35km (22mi) of the volcano. The most recent period of unrest began on March 15, 1980. From the 15th through the 21st over 100 earthquakes were recorded. It was a magnitude 4.2 earthquake recorded on March 20 that provided scientists with the first early warning sign that Mount St. Helens might be preparing for an eruption for the first time since 1857.

 

Although a number of very small earthquakes had been recorded as early as March 15 they were not recognized as immediate precursors to possible volcanic activity.

https://web.archive....1521/31521.html

 

 


Edited by Klaatu_Nicto, Jan 03 2018 - 21:22.


GeorgePreddy #5 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 21:17

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My wife and I drove to the Lodge high up on Mt. Rainier back in 2001 when I was in the Seattle area for 6 weeks training at The Boeing Training Center.

 

It was a great drive up the mountain, which is also a very live volcano that could erupt any time.

 

We had a good view of Mt. St. Helens and we played in the snow in the middle of August.



ArtyAardvark #6 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 21:22

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I went there a few years after the eruption before anything started to grow back, it looked like the surface of the Moon.

Noivy #7 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 21:23

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It's been 38 years since the eruption of St. Helens. There's so little active pressure and cone left from what it was originally it wouldn't even come close to its pretty small eruption in 1980.

 

Now if we were talking about Mt. Rainier, I'd actually be pretty concerned. 



galspanic #8 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 21:50

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View PostNoivy, on Jan 03 2018 - 12:23, said:

It's been 38 years since the eruption of St. Helens. There's so little active pressure and cone left from what it was originally it wouldn't even come close to its pretty small eruption in 1980.

 

Now if we were talking about Mt. Rainier, I'd actually be pretty concerned. 

 

you haven’t really been paying close attention then.

Viper69 #9 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 21:53

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It’s all fun and games and eh I’m not concerned until after. When it comes to nature you don’t **** around and you don’t think you know anything. People have yet to predict volcanic activity with any accuracy that would make me comfortable enough to be lax in attitude about anything. The people of Pompeii knew the history of Vesuvius yet over the centuries they grew used to the mild quakes and even grew their grapes on its slopes. My point is we humans are a young thing on this planet and we don’t know ****

 

Content Moderated by HeadlockMvnky


Edited by HeadlockMvnky, Jan 03 2018 - 22:51.


Noivy #10 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 22:08

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View Postgalspanic, on Jan 03 2018 - 13:50, said:

 

you haven’t really been paying close attention then.

 

Volcanoes and related geology is my study. Mount Saint Helens lost more than a third of its mass in its 1980 VEI-5 euruption (which I will hastily add wasn't even the most powerful eruption world wide in a 20 year span, that honor goes to Pinatubo in the Philippines) , which lost all of its glacier, and has been reduced to a crater with a slowly growing lava dome who's mass isn't even equal to a quarter of what is lost. The worst that Lawetlat'la is now capable of is a localized ash release which won't be capable of any human deaths what so ever (most likely a VEI-3 or lower). unless said humans are really, really stupid  Mt. St Helens is also not as close to civilization as Mt. Rainier, which is a much bigger volcano that St. Helens EVER was.

 

Additionally, most of the greater Seattle area, especially the further south you head is built on Mt. Rainier lahar paths. Mt St Helens was just a fart compared to the literal SHART that Mt. Rainier has now built into waiting to happen.


Edited by Noivy, Jan 03 2018 - 22:14.


Klaatu_Nicto #11 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 22:12

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I was living about 60 miles north of Mt. Saint Helens in 1980.  It was overcast in my area during the May, 1980 eruption so I didn't see that one but I saw the one that occurred a couple of months later. That was a humbling experience.

 

For the first 5 months of 1980 I was working full time for the Weyerhaeuser Companies R&D department while also working part time at Seattle International Raceway (now called Pacific Raceway) and I also lived on the track next to the drag strip finish line. I had been hired by Weyerhaeuser in late December the previous year as temporary with a limited number of hours I could work before being layed off. In February 1980 they assigned me to their forestry lab in Centraila, which is close to St. Helens,  where I worked until I hit the hours limit about two weeks before the big eruption so I got to see first hand some of that early activity at St. Helens. That was a great job. Not only the job, I got paid for the 3 hours driving to and from work, they gave me a loaner car, they paid for the gas and they paid me extra for 3 meals per day.. 

 

In the May eruption the ash mainly blew eastwards but in the July eruption some of that ash came north and coated the racetrack just days before a big event. I could not apply the VHT to the drag strip surface with that ash on it so I had to spend half a day making high speed runs up and down the track throwing up clouds of ash behind me which the wind would blow away and off the track. I was not able to get all the ash off the track but enough to be able to spay the VHT down and we ended up having some of the best traction ever. I remember thinking how great it would be if I could get truckloads of ash to stockpile so I could always mix ash with the VHT. 

 

In the 2000s I had a business about 40 miles north of St. Helens and saw first hand some of the activity that occurred during that period. One day I was on a forum giving a account of what I was seeing.

 

 

How funny that the world newest glacier was born inside a volcano.



Klaatu_Nicto #12 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 22:19

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View PostGeorgePreddy, on Jan 03 2018 - 12:17, said:

My wife and I drove to the Lodge high up on Mt. Rainier back in 2001 when I was in the Seattle area for 6 weeks training at The Boeing Training Center.

 

It was a great drive up the mountain, which is also a very live volcano that could erupt any time.

 

We had a good view of Mt. St. Helens and we played in the snow in the middle of August.

 

  Did you go there through Enumclaw or on the route that goes through the Puyallup South HIll?

Klaatu_Nicto #13 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 22:33

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View PostNoivy, on Jan 03 2018 - 13:08, said:

 

Volcanoes and related geology is my study. Mount Saint Helens lost more than a third of its mass in its 1980 VEI-5 euruption (which I will hastily add wasn't even the most powerful eruption world wide in a 20 year span, that honor goes to Pinatubo in the Philippines) , which lost all of its glacier, and has been reduced to a crater with a slowly growing lava dome who's mass isn't even equal to a quarter of what is lost. The worst that Lawetlat'la is now capable of is a localized ash release which won't be capable of any human deaths what so ever (most likely a VEI-3 or lower). unless said humans are really, really stupid  Mt. St Helens is also not as close to civilization as Mt. Rainier, which is a much bigger volcano that St. Helens EVER was.

 

Additionally, most of the greater Seattle area, especially the further south you head is built on Mt. Rainier lahar paths. Mt St Helens was just a fart compared to the literal SHART that Mt. Rainier has now built into waiting to happen.

 

My house is in the Puyallup Valley so I pay close attention to whats occurring on Mt. Rainier. It might have been a bunch of logs from a lahar that rotted under my house that caused the severe settling problems I now have. Problems which accelerated after the 2001 quake. :izmena:

 

 

 

As I'm sure you know, Rainier does not have to erupt to be deadly.


Edited by Klaatu_Nicto, Jan 03 2018 - 22:33.


Noivy #14 Posted Jan 03 2018 - 22:51

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View PostKlaatu_Nicto, on Jan 03 2018 - 14:33, said:

As I'm sure you know, Rainier does not have to erupt to be deadly.

 

Indeed. Just enough activity to melt the glaciers can cause a disaster unlike anything the US has seen thus far. It's the reason volcano insurance exists. 



Klaatu_Nicto #15 Posted Jan 04 2018 - 00:42

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View PostNoivy, on Jan 03 2018 - 13:51, said:

 

Indeed. Just enough activity to melt the glaciers can cause a disaster unlike anything the US has seen thus far. It's the reason volcano insurance exists. 

 

They just said on KOMO news all of our volcanoes are at normal activity.

 

I once looked into getting volcano insurance but they would only pay to rebuild the house where it had stood.

 

Hmm.....rebuild my home on top of 10+ feet of freshly laid mud.  No, I don't think so.



heavymetal1967 #16 Posted Jan 04 2018 - 01:08

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View PostKlaatu_Nicto, on Jan 03 2018 - 18:42, said:

 

They just said on KOMO news all of our volcanoes are at normal activity.

 

I once looked into getting volcano insurance but they would only pay to rebuild the house where it had stood.

 

Hmm.....rebuild my home on top of 10+ feet of freshly laid mud.  No, I don't think so.

 

Hmm...

 

 

:hiding:;)

 

But seriously hopefully all stays well.



Klaatu_Nicto #17 Posted Jan 04 2018 - 01:25

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^^^^Good cover. :great:

 

 



Klaatu_Nicto #18 Posted Jan 04 2018 - 01:53

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galspanic #19 Posted Jan 04 2018 - 09:36

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View PostNoivy, on Jan 03 2018 - 13:08, said:

 

Volcanoes and related geology is my study. Mount Saint Helens lost more than a third of its mass in its 1980 VEI-5 euruption (which I will hastily add wasn't even the most powerful eruption world wide in a 20 year span, that honor goes to Pinatubo in the Philippines) , which lost all of its glacier, and has been reduced to a crater with a slowly growing lava dome who's mass isn't even equal to a quarter of what is lost. The worst that Lawetlat'la is now capable of is a localized ash release which won't be capable of any human deaths what so ever (most likely a VEI-3 or lower). unless said humans are really, really stupid  Mt. St Helens is also not as close to civilization as Mt. Rainier, which is a much bigger volcano that St. Helens EVER was.

 

Additionally, most of the greater Seattle area, especially the further south you head is built on Mt. Rainier lahar paths. Mt St Helens was just a fart compared to the literal SHART that Mt. Rainier has now built into waiting to happen.

 

Sure, but it has been active and when I go there I notice a change from the last time we went (about every 4 years or so).  Of course The likelihood of a catastrophic explosion is pretty small as of now since it's lost a lot of the pressure.  Mt Hood worries me a lot more living here in the Portland area, but mostly it's because of weird stuff like the Parkdale Lava Flow being so recent and so.... aggressive?  The Sandy River here is also a historical run off slough for Hood and we've built entire towns in that path.

But yes, Rainier is a much bigger threat to human life and property.  Yellowstone or Long Valley may alter human history when they finally go again but Rainier will take almost nothing to get those flows moving.



Klaatu_Nicto #20 Posted Jan 04 2018 - 20:15

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Where the 'Ring of Fire' could ignite in 2018: Researchers reveal the six volcanoes most at risk of eruption
http://www.dailymail...gnite-2018.html

 

Spoiler

 


Edited by Klaatu_Nicto, Jan 04 2018 - 20:16.





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