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How does Longitudinal torsion-bar suspension work?


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PanzerJosh #1 Posted Jan 13 2018 - 06:00

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I'm currently researching the different kinds of suspension used on tanks, and right now I'm on the longitudinal torsion-bar suspension, and it can be seen on the following tanks in the game Tiger (P), VK.45.02  A/B, VK.100.01(P), Mauschen, and the VK.168.01(P), but for the life of me I can not find anything that enplanes how this works, and mainly what the bar on the suspension is. I'll add photos to show more clearly what i'm talking about.

 

hjkfd.png

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SaltCommando #2 Posted Jan 13 2018 - 06:33

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@TheChieftain Drop some knowledge teach! 

IndignantMapleBacon #3 Posted Jan 13 2018 - 06:33

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i think there hydraulic dampers. 

 



ket101 #4 Posted Jan 13 2018 - 06:54

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View PostPanzerJosh, on Jan 13 2018 - 15:00, said:

I'm currently researching the different kinds of suspension used on tanks, and right now I'm on the longitudinal torsion-bar suspension, and it can be seen on the following tanks in the game Tiger (P), VK.45.02  A/B, VK.100.01(P), Mauschen, and the VK.168.01(P), but for the life of me I can not find anything that enplanes how this works, and mainly what the bar on the suspension is. I'll add photos to show more clearly what i'm talking about.

 

hjkfd.png

p.png

 

Yes, the visible bar is the spring, or torsion bar.  The Porsche system is a little complex for a tank, kind of similar in concept to inboard springs used in things like Formula 1 cars, though not at all the same.  Pairs of roadwheels are mounted on a bogie, which pivots on one end of a lever arm (if I'm recalling this correctly).  The other end engages the lug on the side of the torsion bar, twisting it.  I think that's it, but it's been a while since I've seen it and may have gotten details wrong.  The concept has some advantages over transverse torsion bars; the bars are readily accessible from outside the vehicle, it limits the number of holes, and their size, through the armour, and theoretically it's easier to maintain in a battlefield situation.  Practically, though, there was problems, mainly due to weight and relative complexity.

riff_ #5 Posted Jan 13 2018 - 06:54

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A link that may help OP.

https://www.warhistoryonline.com/military-vehicle-news/heavy-tank-destroyer-ferdinand-factsimages.html



ChaosKampf #6 Posted Jan 13 2018 - 07:07

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The torsion bar front suspension on my Montero Sport works by holding each end of the bars captive (one end in control arm, the other in the frame), while "spring" action is provided by twisting action of the straight, spring-tempered, aprox. 1.25" thick bars. They run parallel to the frame, back to a point a little farther back than the front edge of the door, so I would think that would be considered "longitudinal".

Edited by ChaosKampf, Jan 13 2018 - 07:08.


ket101 #7 Posted Jan 13 2018 - 09:43

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View PostChaosKampf, on Jan 13 2018 - 16:07, said:

The torsion bar front suspension on my Montero Sport works by holding each end of the bars captive (one end in control arm, the other in the frame), while "spring" action is provided by twisting action of the straight, spring-tempered, aprox. 1.25" thick bars. They run parallel to the frame, back to a point a little farther back than the front edge of the door, so I would think that would be considered "longitudinal".

 

Cars are different.  Kind of perversely, it's again the Porsche design that is the outsider.  There's an awful lot of cars that use longitudinally placed torsion bars.  The Morris Minor had front torsion bars, longitudinally mounted, and all it's descendants had them, including most Japanese utilities (such as the Toyota Hilux) until about the 90's (yes, they descended from imported English designs, which included the Minor).  Audi is a big torsion bar user, as was Alfa Romeo.  Older Bristol designs used torsion bars as well (Bristol made cars too).  And that is in no way a conclusive list.  But the Porsche design, the Volkswagen Beetle, that had transverse torsion bars on the front, and Beetles had them until the Superbug of the 70's introduced a McPherson strut front end.  The other Porsche also used the front transverse torsion bars for quite a while, and the system was (and I think still is to some extent) popular on off-road buggy style racers.

ChaosKampf #8 Posted Jan 14 2018 - 07:29

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View Postket101, on Jan 13 2018 - 02:43, said:

There's an awful lot of cars that use longitudinally placed torsion bars.

 

Don't think They use them anymore, but some of the MOPAR's used them back in the early-mid 70's. A friend of mine had a 72 or 73 Dodge Dart with Torsion bar front suspension, and Chrysler Imperial's used them as well. Don't think any American-made cars use them nowadays, although I may be wrong.

 



Not_Connery #9 Posted Jan 14 2018 - 14:29

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THEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

 

Longitudinal torsion-bar suspension goes up and down,

 

Up and down,

 

Up and down,

 

The Longitudinal torsion-bar suspension goes up and down,

 

All through the town.

 

 

No one wants to sing along, huh?






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