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Italian Tank Destroyer Line(?)

Italy Tank Destroyers Tech Tree

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TheDgamesD #1 Posted Feb 19 2019 - 00:02

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There's been something that's been bugging me with WoT currently when it comes to it's Tech Tree; Where's the bloody Tank Destroyer line?!? 

I mean it's not like Italy has a shortage of vehicles that they used: Fiat-Ansaldo M11/39, Fiat-Ansaldo Semovente L40 da 47/32, Semovente 75/18 M41, Semovente 75/32 M41, Semovente 75/34 M42, Semovente 75/46 M43, Semovente 105/25 M43, Semovente da 90/50 M36B1, Semovente 90/53 M41M, Semovente Ruotato da 90/52 Breda 501, and the Semovente da 149/40. 
"How could you make a line out of these?" you may ask. It's simple really, what I listed only includes those (that I'm aware of) that were actually put into production, with the exception of the 149/40 in which only one was ever constructed. But what I didn't include in that list would be blueprint prototypes, you know "Paper Tanks" that WG is infamously known for using to fill in the gaps at the higher tiers all the time. Nevertheless what I'd reccomend for a line starting at tier II would be as follows:

 

Tier II: Fiat-Ansaldo Semovente L40 da 47/32

Image result for Fiat-Ansaldo Semovente L40 da 47/32

Armor:
Front: 30 mm (1.2 in)
Sides: 14.5 mm (0.57 in)
Floor: 6 mm (0.24 in)
Main armament:
1 × 47 mm Cannone da 47/32 AT gun - 70 rounds
Engine SPA 18 VT I4 petrol - 68 hp (51 kW) at 2,500 rpm
Speed - 42 km/h

Tier III: Semovente 75/18 M41
dk10whV.jpg
From Wikipedia:
"The Semovente da 75/18 was an Italian self-propelled gun of the Second World War. It was built by mounting the 75 mm Obice da 75/18 modello 34 mountain gun on the chassis of a M13/40, M14/41 or M15/42 tank. The first 60 were built using the M13/40 chassis and a subsequent 162 were built on the M14/41 chassis from 1941 to 1943, when the M15/43 chassis were introduced. The Semovente da 75/18 was intended to be an interim vehicle until the heavier P40 tank could be available."

"This self-propelled gun was built with riveted steel plates, which were thicker but also less sloped than in the original tank (50 mm as against 42 mm max). Frontal armor was almost vertical, but it consisted of two plates that strengthened it when compared to a simple homogeneous steel plate.

The vehicle had its crew compartment and drive section forward, in a large and low casemate; the engine was situated behind it, in a separate structure (typical of Italian designs), which was sloped and somewhat smaller, and had inspection panels on the roof. The chassis was identical to that of M13/40 tanks, with eight small wheels in four trolleys which were joined in pairs by two arms. Suspensions were of the leaf spring type, which was reliable but didn't allow for high speeds. The transmission was located in the forward part of the vehicle, and the crew consisted of only three members: driver, loader/radio operator, and tank commander/gunner.

The main gun was a derivative of a 75 mm L/18 gun, itself a quite modern divisional artillery piece. It was 18 calibers long, with 40° traverse and −12/+22° elevation. The gun had a muzzle brake, and there were several observation and aiming systems (binoculars, periscopes and others) for the crew. The low muzzle velocity (around 450 m/s) meant a relative short range, 9,500 m at best elevation of 45 degrees, but the installation allowed only 22° and so the range was limited to around 7–8 km."

"Although these machines were not widely known, the vehicle performed well in its role. Though it was technically similar to the StuG III, it had a totally different role, serving as divisional artillery instead of a pure assault gun. 

The Semovente da 75/18s were deployed in the North African campaign and during the Allied invasion of Sicily, alongside M tank units to provide additional firepower. Despite the fact that they were not designed to fight other tanks, their 75 mm howitzer proved ideal (thanks to its low muzzle velocity) for firing HEAT shells; its 5.2 kg HEAT shell ("Effetto Pronto" in Italian) could pierce 100mm of armor at 500 meters, and could thus defeat tanks such as the US built M3 Grant and M4 Sherman used by the British Army, In addition to British Built Matilda Tanks. As such, these machines were responsible for many of the successes by the Italian armored troops during 1942–43, when the medium tanks (all armed with a 47 mm gun) were no longer effective."

"Despite its limitations (namely its cramped interior and the insufficiently powerful engine in the M40 and M41 variants), the Semovente da 75/18 proved successful both in the direct support role and in anti-tank fighting; its main advantages, other than their sheer firepower, was in its thicker armor (relative to the medium tanks) and lower silhouette that made it more difficult to hit. Due to these features, the Semovente da 75/18 has been regarded as the only Italian armored fighting vehicle to be seriously feared by Allied tank crews, despite the fact that it was originally conceived for a totally different role. However, it was never employed en masse, and the low number of Semoventi on the field (no more than 30 at the time of the Second Battle of El Alamein) was not enough to turn the tide in Italy's favor."

Armament: 1 × 75 mm obice da 75/18 mod. 34, with 44 rounds of ammo
Ammunition/Penetration:
APCBC (Granata Perforante mod.32) - 51mm
HE (
Granata mod.32) - 10mm
HEAT (EPS M42) - 100mm
Armor: Front: 30–50 mm, Sides/rear: 25 mm 
Crew: 3 (commander/gunner, driver, loader/radio operator)
Speed: 32km/h for the M40 and 34km/h for the M41.

Tier IV: Semovente 75/32 M41
ziFAxNH.jpg
Armament: 75 mm 75/32 mod.37 cannon - 43 Rounds of Ammunition
Ammunition/Penetration:
APCBC (Granata Perforante mod.32) - 76mm
HE (Granata mod. 32) - 10mm
HEAT (EPS M42) - 100mm
Crew - 3 (commander/gunner, driver, loader/radio operator)
Speed - 32km/h
Armor: Front: 30–50 mm, Sides/rear: 30mm 

Tier V: Semovente 75/34 M42

ZCU1sRv.jpg
Armament: 75 mm 75/34 mod.39 cannon - 48 rounds of Ammo
Armor - Front 42-50mm, Sides/Rear - 30mm.
Crew - 3 (commander/gunner, driver, loader/radio operator)
Speed - 35km/h

Tier V Premium: Semovente 90/53 M41M
LsvwqXv.jpg
IEYsWmO.jpg
Armament: 90 mm 90/53 mod.41 cannon - 8-12 Rounds of Ammo
Horizontal Traverse: -45° / 45°

Armor: Hull - 30mm, Gun shield/Turret - 15mm
Speed: 25km/h 
Crew 4 - Commander, Gunner, Loader/ Radio Operator, Driver.

Tier VI: Semovente 105/25 M43 "Bassotto"
SEcq5p2.jpg
uScg8vc.jpg

Armament: 105 mm Cannone Ansaldo da 105/25 cannon - 48 Rounds of Ammo
Armor: Front - 75mm, 
Engine: FIAT SPA 15TB M42 petrol V8 water cooled - 192 hp/2,400 rpm
Speed: 35 km/h

Tier VI Premium: Semovente da 90/50 M36B1

 

 

AMznzX2.jpg
Modification used by Southern Italian Forces after the 1943 Armistace, Consisted of a M36 Jackson turret on a Modified M4A3 chasis. 
Armament: 90 mm Cannone da 90/50 M3A1 cannon - 64 Rounds of Ammunition
Horizontal Traverse: -60°/60°
Armor and Mobility charactaristics are identical to that of the M4A3 in terms of Mobility and half of the armor, the other half of the armor being identical to that of the M36's turret.

Tier VI Premium Artillery: Semovente da 149/40

WIvev7v.jpg
Armor: 14mm
Armament: Cannone da 149/40 modello 35 Shells carried- ? (Caliber =149.1mm)
Crew - 5 (Commander, Gunner, Loader, Loader, Driver/ Radio Operator)
Speed: 21.75km/h
(Quoting Wikipedia): 
"The Italian Army was not far behind the Germans in realizing the need for assault guns and developed a string of vehicles that outwardly resembled the StuG III. These Italian assault guns were produced in appreciable numbers for they were better armoured and quicker to produce than the contemporary Italian tanks. But by the time significant numbers had been issued, Italy was effectively out of the war, and most of these guns fell into German hands. The majority of these semoventi were armed with 75 mm and 105 mm guns and howitzers, but were mostly direct fire weapons. The Italian artillery arm still needed self-propelled artillery weapons to support the armoured formations.

Ansaldo therefore diverted some of its development facilities to design a powerful artillery weapon that could be carried on a tracked chassis. In the end, Ansaldo settled on an existing weapon, the Cannone da 149/40 modello 35 and placed it on a much modified Carro Armato M15/42 tank chassis. The selection of these two pieces of equipment was made in order to produce as good a carriage/weapon combination as possible. The snag however was that the Italian army was already crying out for large numbers of both the gun and tank and Italian industry could not keep up with the demand. This new weapon, the Semovente da 149/40 got off to a shaky start.

The Semovente da 149/40 was a completely unprotected weapon as the long gun barrel was placed on an open mounting carried on the turretless tank chassis. The gun crew stood in the open to serve the gun that had its trunnions mounted right to the rear to absorb some of the recoil forces produced on firing. It was late 1942 before the first prototype was ready for prolonged firing trials, but even before these were over unsuccessful attempts were being made to start production. Before the lines could start rolling the Italians surrendered to the Allies and the Germans took over what was left of the Italian economy. Thus the Semovente da 149/40 prototype remained the sole example of what seemed to be a promising design. The Cannone da 149/40 modello 35 could fire a 46 kg (101 lb) shell to a range of 23,700 metres (25,900 yards), at which distance the lack of protection for the gun crew would have been of relatively little importance."


Tier VII: Semovente 75/46 M43
KTO9B1b.jpg
Pg4X0dt.jpg
"After the armistice of Cassibile signed in September 1943, Northern and Central Italy fell under German control. In 1944 the progress of the war led them to order a new Italian armored vehicle for a tank-fighting role, based on the Semovente da 105/25 self-propelled gun. The result was the Semovente da 75/46, which was renamed Sturmgeschütz M 43 mit 75/46 (852) (i) by the Germans, following their naming convention.

The 75/46 shared the same "M 43" hull of the 105/25. However, the 105 mm L25 howitzer was replaced by a longer 75 mm L46 cannon – originally conceived as a FlaK cannon but also used as an anti-tank gun – which ensured a higher muzzle velocity (750 m/s instead of 510) and a far greater effective range, being able to fire a 6.5 kg (14 lb 5 oz) shell up to 13,000 m (43,000 ft) away. This gun could be loaded with HE or AP rounds; when loaded with the latter, it could pierce up to 90 mm (3.5 in) of armor from 500 m.
The other main difference with its precursor was in the overall increased armor: sloped plates were applied to the casemate and others were added on the sides, above the tracks. Due to these features and despite its origins, the 75/46 is considered a tank destroyer in every respect."

 

Armament: 75 mm OTO 75/43 mod.40 cannon - 42 Rounds
Armor: The Semovente 75/46 retains the improved armor of its 105/ predecessor, with a 25mm slightly-angled frontal plate sitting in front of a flat 75mm plate and a driver's hatch on the left-hand side adding an additional 25mm of protection. This allows the Semovente's frontal armor to effectively provide up to 145mm of penetration when properly angled, or 170mm over the driver's hatch.
Speed: 40km/h


As for what could fit VIII-X? I'm sure there's some sort of blueprint tank they can find or come up with, they've done it before, just look at the Polish line and Chinese TD line.

 



tod914 #2 Posted Feb 19 2019 - 00:10

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Italian Td's... yes please.

Ortinoth_ #3 Posted Feb 19 2019 - 00:14

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and let me guess you want tanks to appear every 2 months? well - let me tell you something it takes at least 6 months per tank for modeling to be done and then another couple of months for the coloring art team to work on all those tanks - so your looking at least 60 months for any new line to be released depending on the number of tanks to come

64sherman #4 Posted Feb 19 2019 - 00:20

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God help us all.  The Bossoto needs to go before the 90/53.  

The advantage of having a turret cannot be understated.  The 90/53 at tier 5 would be broken as all hell.  

Your tier VII would make a much better tier V.  

That 149 thingy ma jig has quite literally 0 degrees of gun depression, because it's an artillery.  Not a TD.  

Tier 8 VIII through X are easy, just use italianized versions of german TD concepts that predate 1943.  Done.  

I'd make it more like this.  

 

 


Edited by 64sherman, Feb 19 2019 - 00:22.


64sherman #5 Posted Feb 19 2019 - 00:21

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View PostOrtinoth_, on Feb 18 2019 - 17:14, said:

and let me guess you want tanks to appear every 2 months? well - let me tell you something it takes at least 6 months per tank for modeling to be done and then another couple of months for the coloring art team to work on all those tanks - so your looking at least 60 months for any new line to be released depending on the number of tanks to come

 

What in the sam hill kind of math is that.  60 months?  5 years to develop a tech tree?  Take your meds and go to sleep.  

 

"depending on the number of tanks to come"

 

Do you actually believe that WG is just a board room of people all sitting at one computer individually modeling 1 tank at a time?  


Edited by 64sherman, Feb 19 2019 - 00:24.


TheDgamesD #6 Posted Feb 19 2019 - 00:31

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View PostOrtinoth_, on Feb 18 2019 - 23:14, said:

and let me guess you want tanks to appear every 2 months? well - let me tell you something it takes at least 6 months per tank for modeling to be done and then another couple of months for the coloring art team to work on all those tanks - so your looking at least 60 months for any new line to be released depending on the number of tanks to come

 

I've been waiting since 2013.

TheDgamesD #7 Posted Feb 19 2019 - 00:40

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View Post64sherman, on Feb 18 2019 - 23:20, said:

God help us all.  The Bossoto needs to go before the 90/53.  

The advantage of having a turret cannot be understated.  The 90/53 at tier 5 would be broken as all hell.  

Your tier VII would make a much better tier V.  

That 149 thingy ma jig has quite literally 0 degrees of gun depression, because it's an artillery.  Not a TD.  

Tier 8 VIII through X are easy, just use italianized versions of german TD concepts that predate 1943.  Done.  

I'd make it more like this.  

First off the 149 isn't on the list as a TD, I actually have it listed as a tier VI Premium artillery. I literally have it listed as "Tier VI Premium Artillery: Semovente da 149/40"
Yes believe it or not I'm actually an advocate for Artillery getting more Premium vehicles as long as they're balanced within reason. As since they're the only class that almost every nation doesn't have a premium for its artillery line, aside from France and Britain, which you can't even get those two now anyway. 

as for the 90/53? why should it be TV? one reason: Ammo count: at most she could carry 9 Shells, and that's counting one shell in the barrel already. Besides its not a 360* rotating turret, its similar to that of the FV215B 183, IE only being able to traverse 45* to the left and 45* to the right. As a result you'd be paying for the gimmick of the alpha dmg it can dish out with that 90mm at its tier and trading it for the very low shell count.

As for the VII? yeah its alpha would be lower, but the amount of armor it has (120+mm) kinda makes it not suited to be at Tier V or VI, due to 10* of gun depression + that kind of armor would make it blatantly overpowered given the artificial sloping that would apply on the tank. so while it's alpha would be slow, DPM would well make up for it. Its trading off punching power for armor in a similar manner to the AT2 at its tier.



mlinke #8 Posted Feb 19 2019 - 00:57

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Please NO

TheDgamesD #9 Posted Feb 19 2019 - 01:13

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View Postmlinke, on Feb 18 2019 - 23:57, said:

Please NO

 

Ok, then why not?

Baron_Von_Krieg #10 Posted Feb 19 2019 - 01:37

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View PostTheDgamesD, on Feb 18 2019 - 18:02, said:

There's been something that's been bugging me with WoT currently when it comes to it's Tech Tree; Where's the bloody Tank Destroyer line?!? 

I mean it's not like Italy has a shortage of vehicles that they used: Fiat-Ansaldo M11/39, Fiat-Ansaldo Semovente L40 da 47/32, Semovente 75/18 M41, Semovente 75/32 M41, Semovente 75/34 M42, Semovente 75/46 M43, Semovente 105/25 M43, Semovente da 90/50 M36B1, Semovente 90/53 M41M, Semovente Ruotato da 90/52 Breda 501, and the Semovente da 149/40. 
"How could you make a line out of these?" you may ask. It's simple really, what I listed only includes those (that I'm aware of) that were actually put into production, with the exception of the 149/40 in which only one was ever constructed. But what I didn't include in that list would be blueprint prototypes, you know "Paper Tanks" that WG is infamously known for using to fill in the gaps at the higher tiers all the time. Nevertheless what I'd reccomend for a line starting at tier II would be as follows:

 

Tier II: Fiat-Ansaldo Semovente L40 da 47/32

Image result for Fiat-Ansaldo Semovente L40 da 47/32

Armor:
Front: 30 mm (1.2 in)
Sides: 14.5 mm (0.57 in)
Floor: 6 mm (0.24 in)
Main armament:
1 × 47 mm Cannone da 47/32 AT gun - 70 rounds
Engine SPA 18 VT I4 petrol - 68 hp (51 kW) at 2,500 rpm
Speed - 42 km/h

Tier III: Semovente 75/18 M41
dk10whV.jpg
From Wikipedia:
"The Semovente da 75/18 was an Italian self-propelled gun of the Second World War. It was built by mounting the 75 mm Obice da 75/18 modello 34 mountain gun on the chassis of a M13/40, M14/41 or M15/42 tank. The first 60 were built using the M13/40 chassis and a subsequent 162 were built on the M14/41 chassis from 1941 to 1943, when the M15/43 chassis were introduced. The Semovente da 75/18 was intended to be an interim vehicle until the heavier P40 tank could be available."

"This self-propelled gun was built with riveted steel plates, which were thicker but also less sloped than in the original tank (50 mm as against 42 mm max). Frontal armor was almost vertical, but it consisted of two plates that strengthened it when compared to a simple homogeneous steel plate.

The vehicle had its crew compartment and drive section forward, in a large and low casemate; the engine was situated behind it, in a separate structure (typical of Italian designs), which was sloped and somewhat smaller, and had inspection panels on the roof. The chassis was identical to that of M13/40 tanks, with eight small wheels in four trolleys which were joined in pairs by two arms. Suspensions were of the leaf spring type, which was reliable but didn't allow for high speeds. The transmission was located in the forward part of the vehicle, and the crew consisted of only three members: driver, loader/radio operator, and tank commander/gunner.

The main gun was a derivative of a 75 mm L/18 gun, itself a quite modern divisional artillery piece. It was 18 calibers long, with 40° traverse and −12/+22° elevation. The gun had a muzzle brake, and there were several observation and aiming systems (binoculars, periscopes and others) for the crew. The low muzzle velocity (around 450 m/s) meant a relative short range, 9,500 m at best elevation of 45 degrees, but the installation allowed only 22° and so the range was limited to around 7–8 km."

"Although these machines were not widely known, the vehicle performed well in its role. Though it was technically similar to the StuG III, it had a totally different role, serving as divisional artillery instead of a pure assault gun. 

The Semovente da 75/18s were deployed in the North African campaign and during the Allied invasion of Sicily, alongside M tank units to provide additional firepower. Despite the fact that they were not designed to fight other tanks, their 75 mm howitzer proved ideal (thanks to its low muzzle velocity) for firing HEAT shells; its 5.2 kg HEAT shell ("Effetto Pronto" in Italian) could pierce 100mm of armor at 500 meters, and could thus defeat tanks such as the US built M3 Grant and M4 Sherman used by the British Army, In addition to British Built Matilda Tanks. As such, these machines were responsible for many of the successes by the Italian armored troops during 1942–43, when the medium tanks (all armed with a 47 mm gun) were no longer effective."

"Despite its limitations (namely its cramped interior and the insufficiently powerful engine in the M40 and M41 variants), the Semovente da 75/18 proved successful both in the direct support role and in anti-tank fighting; its main advantages, other than their sheer firepower, was in its thicker armor (relative to the medium tanks) and lower silhouette that made it more difficult to hit. Due to these features, the Semovente da 75/18 has been regarded as the only Italian armored fighting vehicle to be seriously feared by Allied tank crews, despite the fact that it was originally conceived for a totally different role. However, it was never employed en masse, and the low number of Semoventi on the field (no more than 30 at the time of the Second Battle of El Alamein) was not enough to turn the tide in Italy's favor."

Armament: 1 × 75 mm obice da 75/18 mod. 34, with 44 rounds of ammo
Ammunition/Penetration:
APCBC (Granata Perforante mod.32) - 51mm
HE (
Granata mod.32) - 10mm
HEAT (EPS M42) - 100mm
Armor: Front: 30–50 mm, Sides/rear: 25 mm 
Crew: 3 (commander/gunner, driver, loader/radio operator)
Speed: 32km/h for the M40 and 34km/h for the M41.

Tier IV: Semovente 75/32 M41
ziFAxNH.jpg
Armament: 75 mm 75/32 mod.37 cannon - 43 Rounds of Ammunition
Ammunition/Penetration:
APCBC (Granata Perforante mod.32) - 76mm
HE (Granata mod. 32) - 10mm
HEAT (EPS M42) - 100mm
Crew - 3 (commander/gunner, driver, loader/radio operator)
Speed - 32km/h
Armor: Front: 30–50 mm, Sides/rear: 30mm 

Tier V: Semovente 75/34 M42

ZCU1sRv.jpg
Armament: 75 mm 75/34 mod.39 cannon - 48 rounds of Ammo
Armor - Front 42-50mm, Sides/Rear - 30mm.
Crew - 3 (commander/gunner, driver, loader/radio operator)
Speed - 35km/h

Tier V Premium: Semovente 90/53 M41M
LsvwqXv.jpg
IEYsWmO.jpg
Armament: 90 mm 90/53 mod.41 cannon - 8-12 Rounds of Ammo
Horizontal Traverse: -45° / 45°

Armor: Hull - 30mm, Gun shield/Turret - 15mm
Speed: 25km/h 
Crew 4 - Commander, Gunner, Loader/ Radio Operator, Driver.

Tier VI: Semovente 105/25 M43 "Bassotto"
SEcq5p2.jpg
uScg8vc.jpg

Armament: 105 mm Cannone Ansaldo da 105/25 cannon - 48 Rounds of Ammo
Armor: Front - 75mm, 
Engine: FIAT SPA 15TB M42 petrol V8 water cooled - 192 hp/2,400 rpm
Speed: 35 km/h

Tier VI Premium: Semovente da 90/50 M36B1

 

 

AMznzX2.jpg
Modification used by Southern Italian Forces after the 1943 Armistace, Consisted of a M36 Jackson turret on a Modified M4A3 chasis. 
Armament: 90 mm Cannone da 90/50 M3A1 cannon - 64 Rounds of Ammunition
Horizontal Traverse: -60°/60°
Armor and Mobility charactaristics are identical to that of the M4A3 in terms of Mobility and half of the armor, the other half of the armor being identical to that of the M36's turret.

Tier VI Premium Artillery: Semovente da 149/40

WIvev7v.jpg
Armor: 14mm
Armament: Cannone da 149/40 modello 35 Shells carried- ? (Caliber =149.1mm)
Crew - 5 (Commander, Gunner, Loader, Loader, Driver/ Radio Operator)
Speed: 21.75km/h
(Quoting Wikipedia): 
"The Italian Army was not far behind the Germans in realizing the need for assault guns and developed a string of vehicles that outwardly resembled the StuG III. These Italian assault guns were produced in appreciable numbers for they were better armoured and quicker to produce than the contemporary Italian tanks. But by the time significant numbers had been issued, Italy was effectively out of the war, and most of these guns fell into German hands. The majority of these semoventi were armed with 75 mm and 105 mm guns and howitzers, but were mostly direct fire weapons. The Italian artillery arm still needed self-propelled artillery weapons to support the armoured formations.

Ansaldo therefore diverted some of its development facilities to design a powerful artillery weapon that could be carried on a tracked chassis. In the end, Ansaldo settled on an existing weapon, the Cannone da 149/40 modello 35 and placed it on a much modified Carro Armato M15/42 tank chassis. The selection of these two pieces of equipment was made in order to produce as good a carriage/weapon combination as possible. The snag however was that the Italian army was already crying out for large numbers of both the gun and tank and Italian industry could not keep up with the demand. This new weapon, the Semovente da 149/40 got off to a shaky start.

The Semovente da 149/40 was a completely unprotected weapon as the long gun barrel was placed on an open mounting carried on the turretless tank chassis. The gun crew stood in the open to serve the gun that had its trunnions mounted right to the rear to absorb some of the recoil forces produced on firing. It was late 1942 before the first prototype was ready for prolonged firing trials, but even before these were over unsuccessful attempts were being made to start production. Before the lines could start rolling the Italians surrendered to the Allies and the Germans took over what was left of the Italian economy. Thus the Semovente da 149/40 prototype remained the sole example of what seemed to be a promising design. The Cannone da 149/40 modello 35 could fire a 46 kg (101 lb) shell to a range of 23,700 metres (25,900 yards), at which distance the lack of protection for the gun crew would have been of relatively little importance."


Tier VII: Semovente 75/46 M43
KTO9B1b.jpg
Pg4X0dt.jpg
"After the armistice of Cassibile signed in September 1943, Northern and Central Italy fell under German control. In 1944 the progress of the war led them to order a new Italian armored vehicle for a tank-fighting role, based on the Semovente da 105/25 self-propelled gun. The result was the Semovente da 75/46, which was renamed Sturmgeschütz M 43 mit 75/46 (852) (i) by the Germans, following their naming convention.

The 75/46 shared the same "M 43" hull of the 105/25. However, the 105 mm L25 howitzer was replaced by a longer 75 mm L46 cannon – originally conceived as a FlaK cannon but also used as an anti-tank gun – which ensured a higher muzzle velocity (750 m/s instead of 510) and a far greater effective range, being able to fire a 6.5 kg (14 lb 5 oz) shell up to 13,000 m (43,000 ft) away. This gun could be loaded with HE or AP rounds; when loaded with the latter, it could pierce up to 90 mm (3.5 in) of armor from 500 m.
The other main difference with its precursor was in the overall increased armor: sloped plates were applied to the casemate and others were added on the sides, above the tracks. Due to these features and despite its origins, the 75/46 is considered a tank destroyer in every respect."

 

Armament: 75 mm OTO 75/43 mod.40 cannon - 42 Rounds
Armor: The Semovente 75/46 retains the improved armor of its 105/ predecessor, with a 25mm slightly-angled frontal plate sitting in front of a flat 75mm plate and a driver's hatch on the left-hand side adding an additional 25mm of protection. This allows the Semovente's frontal armor to effectively provide up to 145mm of penetration when properly angled, or 170mm over the driver's hatch.
Speed: 40km/h


As for what could fit VIII-X? I'm sure there's some sort of blueprint tank they can find or come up with, they've done it before, just look at the Polish line and Chinese TD line.

 

 

Awesome !!

ZoM_2014 #11 Posted Feb 19 2019 - 01:44

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hmm prem arty *Shutup and take my money*

Major_Faux #12 Posted Feb 19 2019 - 01:52

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:girl: I LOVE IT! Let us do it! Oh wait, "us" can't do. They (WG) don't work for us, they have to do it.

 

More Maps, PLEASE.



TheDgamesD #13 Posted Feb 20 2019 - 01:38

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View PostZoM_2014, on Feb 19 2019 - 00:44, said:

hmm prem arty *Shutup and take my money*

 

honestly as much as people hate the class, each nation should have at least one Premium artillery that they can use as a crew trainer, as it honestly isnt fair for them to be the only class in game without premiums. (that you can still buy)

WeSayNotToday #14 Posted Feb 20 2019 - 05:46

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Italian TDs, yes plz!

FineousOrlon #15 Posted Feb 20 2019 - 11:33

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View PostTheDgamesD, on Feb 19 2019 - 00:02, said:

There's been something that's been bugging me with WoT currently when it comes to it's Tech Tree; Where's the bloody Tank Destroyer line?!? 

I mean it's not like Italy has a shortage of vehicles that they used: Fiat-Ansaldo M11/39, Fiat-Ansaldo Semovente L40 da 47/32, Semovente 75/18 M41, Semovente 75/32 M41, Semovente 75/34 M42, Semovente 75/46 M43, Semovente 105/25 M43, Semovente da 90/50 M36B1, Semovente 90/53 M41M, Semovente Ruotato da 90/52 Breda 501, and the Semovente da 149/40. 
"How could you make a line out of these?" you may ask. It's simple really...

 

Nice work, let's do this!   Let's watch WG do it for us and support them!

Lord_Magus #16 Posted Feb 23 2019 - 23:16

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View PostTheDgamesD, on Feb 20 2019 - 01:38, said:

 

honestly as much as people hate the class, each nation should have at least one Premium artillery that they can use as a crew trainer, as it honestly isnt fair for them to be the only class in game without premiums. (that you can still buy)

 

But there's no reason to do that for nations that don't have and will probably never have an arty line of their own. Such as Italy.

TheDgamesD #17 Posted Feb 25 2019 - 04:54

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I mean the Italian Semovente were designed to serve as both SPGs and TD's, and served as both in WW2

AllardLiao117 #18 Posted Yesterday, 04:35 AM

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I know this is a little old, but I have a couple of suggestions: 

As an alternative Tier II, the L3/CC, with its 20mm AT rifle.

At Tiers IX and X, thanks to the wheeled vehicles, we could put in the Centauro models. 

 

Also, someone on another Italian tech tree thread posited an interesting quirk these vehicles could have: an alternative combat mode (similar to the Swedish TDs) that allows them to commit indirect fire. Not quite to the same extent as proper arty, but maybe just enough to loop the shell over low cover.






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