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★ A Detailed Guide to Armor Mechanics & How to Angle your Tank ★

The Scorpions Den Scorpiany Armor Mechanics Overmatch Angling Sidescraping Hull down Spaced Armor HE

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Scorpiany #1 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 01:13

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Some of the core gameplay mechanics in World of Tanks involve using your armor effectively. However, there’s actually a lot that goes into effectively being able to use your tank’s armor, and each tank may require different gameplay because of its unique armor layout.

 

In this guide, we’ll discuss both the basics, and the more advances aspects of armor angling. This includes side-scraping, poking around corners, pike-noses and more. We will also mention some ammo mechanics, since they also play a role as to how effective your armor may be, but we will mostly be focusing on the gameplay element of armor itself – Such as how to correctly angle your tank in different situations.

 

Let’s get started, shall we?


 

First, it’s important to understand why armor mechanics in this game can be so difficult to understand at times. Every tank’s armor profile can be vastly different, not just from other tanks, but even the numbers that you see listed in the Garage!

 

WG only gives you 3 values in the garage, one for the tank’s frontal armor, one for the side, and one for the rear. Here’s where things get tricky though.

Let’s say a tank is listed as having 120mm of armor on the front. When looking at a tank from the front, such as this Caernarvon below, you’ll realize that each part of the front is different!

 

 

 

 

The cupola will be a different thickness from the roof armor, the gun mantlet may provide extra protection, and even the upper and lower plates will be a different thickness.

 

As you can see, that “120mm” means absolutely nothing in an actual battle scenario. Plus, mechanics such as overmatch (for extremely thin armor) and auto-ricochet (for extremely angled armor) also have to be kept in mind. We’ll explain just how those work later in the guide.

 

 

 

 

The Caernarvon in the second image was on the same ridgeline, except this time we were looking at him from below. In the first image, he was on level ground. You can see how just changing where we viewed the tank from, changed how his armor profile appeared to us.

 

At this point you’re probably thinking “Well crap, there’s no way for me to be able to learn how to deal with tanks like these”! Fear not – Some tanks aren’t nearly as difficult to figure out. Let’s look at this Kranvagn below for example.

 

 

 

 

Well, that was pretty simple, wasn’t it? Obviously there’s more to it than just that, but let’s take things step by step for now.

 

The Kranvagn was the perfect example of two things:

  • Armor thickness
  • Armor angling

 

The Kranvagn’s cupolas are just too thin, so you’ll pretty much always penetrate them if you hit them (Even if they’re tiny targets). The turret is too thick to deal with – Even if we ignore its angle, it has so much raw thickness behind it that there’s simply no way for you to reliably penetrate it no matter how you try to shoot it.

 

The hull armor is a bit more complicated, because of the angles – But in general, the upper plate is too angled for most regular shells to penetrate (Some really high pen shells and Premium rounds can deal with it, because it’s not as thick as the turret). And then the lower plate, it’s just flat – It has no angling behind it, so even though it’s moderately thick, low penetration guns can go straight through it.

 

Essentially, the thicker that an armor plate is, or the better angled that it is, the less likely you are to penetrate it.

Thick + Angled = No chance

Thick + Flat = Maybe

Thin + Angled = Maybe

Thin + Flat = Every time

 

Before we move on, let’s take a look at the Kranvagn one more time. Some parts of the tank move along with your turret. This means that if you’re pointing your gun up / down, then a certain part of the armor may move along with it. Here’s what it looks like for the Kranvagn.

 

 

 

 

Wow, now the top of the turret became a huge landing strip for shells, screaming “Penetrate me here”. All this is because the Kranvagn pointed his turret straight down towards the ground. Here’s the problem – His turret roof (and his cupolas) move along with his turret / gun. This means that when he points the turret down while we’re still at the same height as him, he exposes his entire turret roof.

 

If we were below him, this wouldn’t be a problem – He’d end up hiding the roof and cupolas completely.


 

Before we move on to some of the more complicated armor mechanics, let’s cover something super important first, relating to the Kranvagn.

 

You know how we mentioned that when you move your gun in the Kranvagn, the top of the turret and cupolas move based on where the gun is pointing? To demonstrate this point even further, I want to demonstrate what a big difference moving your gun around can make with the Lowe’s turret. I’ll be shooting it with my A-43’s APCR shells.

 

 

 

 

If the Lowe is pointing its gun to the sky like this, it’s showing its vulnerable turret ring.

 

 

 

 

All of a sudden, the Lowe’s super strong turret armor just got penetrated 4/5 times by a tiny little 57mm gun with 189mm of penetration.

 

Isn’t the Lowe’s turret supposed to be super strong? Well, yes. However, it needs the gun mantlet to be covering the turret ring. In order to do this, point your gun down between shells to cover up the weak turret ring.

 

 

 

 

Now, 4/5 shells bounced off just because the Lowe’s gun was pointing to the ground. The 5th one didn’t do any damage either, it just got absorbed by the gun mantlet.

 

By pointing your gun down, the gun mantlet became an extra layer of armor on top of the turret ring’s armor behind it. When one layer of armor directly covers another layer of armor, this is what is called “spaced armor”.

 

It’s a super effective way to stop shells from penetrating enemy armor, and many Soviet and some Chinese tanks are known for having ridiculous amounts of spaced armor on them. However, as we’ll see in a moment, the king of spaced armor is actually an American tank…


 

Let’s take a look at a different kind of tank. It will look similar to the Caernarvon, except there’s one problem – It has armor plates on top of its armor! This is what’s called “spaced armor” – When one or more additional plates of armor is placed in front of the tanks’ actual armor itself.

 

 

 

 

Usually, only Russian and Chinese tanks have spaced armor down the sides of the tanks. However, rare cases such as the Super Pershing are around, so if you shot at something that looked flat and easy to penetrate, but nothing happened, it might have been spaced!


 

Alright, alright, there’s a million and a half reasons why I can’t penetrate the tank in front of me. But what about tanks without armor? Is there anything my potato launcher can do?

 

Well, yes! Let’s introduce you to the world of “overmatching”. It’s a relatively simple concept, but always sounds super complicated when it’s explained. Let’s start with the confusing sounding part:

 

If your tank’s gun is over three times the caliber that the enemy’s armor thickness, then you will be guaranteed to penetrate each time with AP / APCR shells regardless of angle.

 

Bleh. Disgusting. That jumble of words. Here’s what it actually means. Let’s take a look at this AMX 50B angling around the corner.

 

 

 

 

The entire tank?! Well, you can penetrate his entire tank, but only the side is because of overmatch mechanics.

 

His side armor is 30mm thick. Multiply by 3, and you get 90mm. That means that all guns over 90mm will be able to penetrate him each and every single time. Sadly, this means a Mutz’s 90mm can’t. But an Obj. 416’s 105mm will turn that side into tissue paper.

 

So, the question becomes – What options does this AMX 50B driver have if his side armor is made of tissue paper against most guns it fights against?

Well, he has to find a way to fight without exposing that part of his side armor. He has two options here. Let’s start with the most obvious one, but one that’s still not a very good solution.

 

 

 

 

In theory, his side is completely hidden here… But the rest of his tank just became the world’s easiest target. So it’s not really much better of a solution, is it?

Here’s the smartest way for him to angle his tank now.

 

 

 

 

That’s a lot better! It’s not perfect, but it’s definitely better than showing your entire tank, or showing your weakest armor. Now, the AMX 50B’s upper plate gets the chance to bounce some shells, and even the lower plate may bounce a shell or too. The turret is still pretty easy to penetrate, but it’s a pretty good solution for an otherwise lightly armored tank.

 

The AMX50B makes a great Segway onto a different type of armor profile though. You’ll have noticed that the Kranvagn and AMX 50B both had a hull that looked 3 like triangles all pointing towards one-another. This is what’s called a “pike nose”.


 

The pike nose is very effective from the front, because that’s when it’s most angled. However, as you begin going around corners, one part becomes weaker and one part becomes stronger. That’s why the AMX 50B’s upper plate was red on the far side, but yellow on the closer side. The less angled part became easier to penetrate as he went around the corner.

 

The AMX 50B also showed how difficult it can be to position a pike-nosed tank. It’s certainly far from easy to figure out. So what happens when a more heavily armored tank with a pike-nose wants to make the most of its armor?

 

At first, the same 3 scenarios come to mind, but none of them are very good solutions if the tank is supposed to be “heavily armored”. Luckily, there’s a 4th trick.

 

But first, let’s see why the first 3 scenarios don’t work very well for the IS-7.

 

 

 

 

In all 3 of these scenarios, part of the IS-7’s armor is still vulnerable. Sure, it’s still a very difficult tank to penetrate… But it’s still showing some weaker areas.

So how do we position it in such a way that it would become impossible to penetrate the tank with standard ammunition?

 

 

 

 

This is called reverse sidescraping! It’s just like normal side-scraping, except the tank is pointing away from the building instead of towards it.

You have to be very careful when doing it – If you’re not careful, you’ll expose your very vulnerable rear armor, which would defeat the purpose of angling your armor in the first place!

 

 

 

 

 

To reverse sidescrape correctly, you have to make sure that:

  1. Your side is still sufficiently angled
  2. Your rear armor isn’t showing
  3. You can still point your gun at the enemy (Some tanks don’t have gun depression over their backs!)

 

Does this mean that all tanks with strangely shaped fronts have to reverse sidescrape to become extremely difficult to penetrate?

 

Well… Not quite. There are some tanks with plenty of triangle-shaped armor plates on their front, but it’s far from a pike nose. Let’s take a look at tanks such as the Obj. 430.

 

 

 

 

Aside from the very vulnerable cupola, the rest of the Obj. 430’s armor at this angle is extremely difficult for most guns to penetrate. It’s not completely immune to damage – But it’s certainly going to be annoying to deal with.

 

Why is this the case? Almost all of the upper plate is still hidden behind the corner. The Obj. 430’s strange, flattened pancake UFO shape makes this possible. The part of the front plate that does stick out is angled so much that you simply won’t penetrate it with most guns.

 

 

 

 

The downside to this kind of hull shape is the upper plate itself isn’t that angled. It has some angling sure, but it’s not nearly as steep as the IS-7’s upper plate. However, this strange shape allows the Obj. 430 to sidescrape around corners in ways that the IS-7 cannot. The upper plate is angled downwards as you approach the tracks, and everything above it is extremely well angled. Thus around a corner, you’re only showing your tracks and the very well angled part that sticks out.


 

Let’s take a look at the other end of the spectrum – What has to happen for a lightly armored tank to begin bouncing shells left right and center as though it were a superheavy tank?

 

Let’s take a look at the A-43 in the image below.

 

 

 

 

Clearly something has to be going on for a Tier 6 medium to be shrugging off Tier 8 medium shells without breaking a sweat. This was a live fire drill too – He was free to shoot wherever he could / wanted.

 

So, what’s going on? 3 things at once:

  • The cupola is hidden around a corner
  • The tank is reverse sidescraping
  • The rear plate is extremely angled

 

The A-43 doesn’t have a pike nose, but because the turret is so far to the front, it can easily poke around corners and shoot freely without much effort at all.

 

 

 

 

Well that’s something, isn’t it? The cupola is completely hidden around the corner because it’s so far to one side, and the tank is extremely well angled, so the Super Pershing doesn’t have many options for where to shoot. It can try to hit the turret, but it’s angled and has a gun mantlet too – So it’s still a tricky shot, especially at longer distances where guns might not be so reliable.

 

However, let’s say the Super Pershing finally catches the A-43 in the open. What’s the A-43 to do?

 

 

 

 

Trick question, it’s a Russian tank, just grab a bottle of vodka and begin squatting while chugging it away. All shells will magically begin bouncing off of your rear.

 

No? Well, it might have something to do with just how angled the rear plate itself is. You can see how steep the ricocheted mark actually was – There’s no way for any shells to get through armor that well angled, unless it’s overmatch.

 

A-43’s rear plate is 30mm. Super Pershing’s gun is a 90mm. Remember how for overmatch to work, the gun has to be over three times the caliber of the armor? Super Pershing’s gun is exactly 3 times the caliber. If it was any larger in caliber, it could overmatch. But only over 3 times works for overmatch. Super Pershing’s gun is as close in caliber as you can get without being able to overmatch.

 

This allows the A-43 to drive around backwards and shrug shells off. It’s also why I always say the A-43 is a far better tank than the Cromwell – not only is the A-43’s gun more reliable, but the armor is actually very useful – You just have to know how to use it!


 

Let’s now emphasis one very important mechanic. We’ve discussed how to angle your tank so that shells can’t penetrate it. But what happens if you’re not very careful when angling your side armor? Or why is that that sometimes a well-angled side still gets penetrated?

 

Unfortunately, this becomes one of the easiest ways to destroy a player’s tank, and many new players are quickly destroyed with seemingly nothing they can do because they weren’t careful enough when angling their side.

 

Let’s take a look at the T110E5. Its side armor isn’t very strong, but it’s still fairly well angled and usually can do a pretty good job at sidescraping. However, every now and then, shells will not just penetrate its side armor, but they’ll destroy the tracks and damage the ammo rack.

 

 

 

 

This T110E5 is being shot at by my A-43’s APCR once again. In general, its side armor is pretty well angled here, and I wouldn’t be able to penetrate most of it. However, small parts of the side armor near the road wheels are still vulernable.

 

By shooting the road wheels on tanks, you can break their tracks. This is fairly well known, but you don’t have to shoot the front road wheel in order to do this.

If you look closely at the image in the T110E5, I’m actually shooting slightly behind its road wheel here.

 

 

 

 

This means that if you’re not careful when sidescraping, even if your frontal roadwheel is still hidden behind cover, your tracks can still be damaged and broken, while you take damage!

 

Be very careful when angling your tank! The exact angles that a tank can / can’t be penetrated by are as follow:

  • 70 degree angles and steeper will bounce all AP and APCR shells (if no overmatch)
  • 85 degree angles and steeper will bounce all HEAT shells (overmatch doesn’t apply)
  • HE will almost never ricochet, but will instead explode on contact.

 

However, those are all just general numbers. Your side armor may not all be angled in the same way or shape. Your side armor may be weaker or stronger in certain areas (Which means one part might get overmatched but the other part won’t).

 

Each tank is different, and at the end of the day, the best way to learn is through experience. If you keep getting penetrated in the side at the angle you’re using, make it steeper! If nobody is shooting your side at all, then maybe the angle is too steep.

 

The best players get a sense for when their tank is almost exactly at the perfect angle of a ricochet. They’ll wiggle their tank around to trick people into thinking their side armor became a vulnerable weakpoint, when in reality, the player is changing the angle just as the tank reaches 70 degrees.

 

This takes a while to learn, but once you get the hang of it, you’ll become a much tougher target to deal with on the battlefield!


 

Speaking of what happens when you’re not careful with your angling, the same concepts apply to your roof armor. If somebody is above your tank, then your roof armor becomes extremely weak. The roofs of tanks generally are extremely thin, and often will be overmatched by standard shells.

 

However, if you’re above an opponent, feel free to load your HE shells and aim at the flattest part of the roof that you can.

 

 

 

 

Ouch. That 113 just took over 1,100 damage from a T110E4’s HE – That’s over 50% more damage than an AP shell would have dealt.

 

If somebody is above you, try to get away as soon as possible. Otherwise, your battle may end much more quickly than you would have liked.


 

Just a couple more things to cover now. If we think back to the many tanks we talked about that have spaced armor, it’s important to understand that spaced armor can still be penetrated. However, you have to have high enough penetration, and you have to be very careful with which type of ammunition you’re using.

 

Here’s my K-91 shooting at a Super Conqueror’s side armor. I’ve fired 4 HEAT shells, each of which have 330mm of penetration, but not a single one penetrated!

 

 

 

 

Yet as soon as I switch to my standard APCR shells, which only have 276mm of penetration by comparison, I begin penetrating every single shell!

 

 

 

 

You’d think that the higher penetration shell would have the easier time penetrating the target. However, spaced armor is extremely resilient against HEAT shells. HEAT shells “explode” on contact, but the shell can still pass through armor. However, it loses penetration power very quickly, and thick spaced armor or widely spaced armor plates will easily block the shell from passing through the armor behind it.

 

A standard AP or APCR shell however, will keep travelling past the spaced armor with much greater ease. While it will still lose some penetration power, it won’t lose that penetration nearly as quickly as HEAT shells would, which means against tanks like the Super Conqueror, AP or APCR will make the side armor into cheese, while HEAT shells will rarely if ever get through.


 

It’s worth noting that even though that spaced armor is great against HEAT shells, it’s actually very weak against HE shells.

 

While they both explode on contact, HE shells do damage based on the weakest armor within their splash radius. Often times when you’re shooting at spaced armor, the HE shell will splash over a tank’s hull roof or turret roof.

 

In the case of the Super Conqueror, it’s covered in spaced armor – And it has an extremely vulnerable hull roof. This means that HE shells to the turret will often do 200 damage a piece from a 122mm gun. This can quickly wear down your opponents HP, especially in tanks with fairly good rate of fire.

 

 

 

 

This means that next time you see a Super Conqueror dominating a ridgeline, feel free to put a few HE shells into its spaced armor shield, or even its gun mantlet! You’ll find yourself quickly tearing it apart with most guns above 105mm.


 

While there’s still a lot more that goes into armor mechanics, I think this is a pretty good place to stop.

 

This guide should have provided you with all of the information that you’d need to become a real powerhouse on the battlefield. If you can learn, practice and master the mechanics that we’ve discussed in this guide, you’ll find yourself winning more battles of course… But the most important thing is that you’ll begin learning not just from your own mistakes, but from the enemy’s mistakes as well.

 

I hope this guide was useful! I wish to all of you the very best of luck and fun, both in real life and on the battlefield, tankers! :honoring:


 

(Upvotes are greatly appreciated! I put a lot of effort into this guide)

 



0Aim #2 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 01:29

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You really put a lot of time into this. I knew a lot of this already because I am rather experienced, but it is a great guide. If I'm going to be honest, I find it easier to follow a video, with the commentary over it. Definitely an Upvote though.

RaynorShyne #3 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 01:33

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Bravo, dear sir.  Bravo.

 

This is excellent!   You should also  place it in the newcomers forum



sniper272 #4 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 01:34

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Even as a fairly seasoned player I learned something new(that bit about the track wheel models). Thanks for taking the time to write this up. 

F1O1 #5 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 01:39

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HE is effective vs spaced armour? First time l have heard that.

 



F1O1 #6 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 01:40

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Great guide, helps alot of newcomers, +1

Scorpiany #7 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 01:50

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View PostF1O1, on Apr 10 2019 - 18:39, said:

HE is effective vs spaced armour? First time l have heard that.

 

 

Spaced armor will prevent HE from penetrating, but a common misconception is that it helps tanks take less damage from HE. The problem is, as I demonstrated with the Super Conqueror, the spaced armor sheilds give the shell a place to detonate where it can then proceed to splash over the roof armor of the tank itself.

 

Caern AX vs. the regular Caern, or the Cheiftain vs. the Super Conqueror demonstrates this fairly well. While all of those tanks will still take substantial HE damage, the Caern AX and the Super Conqueror will consistently take more HE damage, and receive more hits that do larger amounts than the regular Caern and Cheiftain which don't have that spaced armor shield.

 

Where spaced armor really shines is against HEAT shells, since it will often stop them from penetrating completely. But spaced armor against HE just provides it with a landing platform to splash the hull roof. There are exceptions of course, such as if you're playing the Wolverine and getting shot by M4 Sherman derps which otherwise might have penned - But at the higher Tiers, or for any non-penetrating HE shell, spaced armor usually doesn't help in preventing the armor from getting penetrated, so it only makes the tank more vulnerable versus HE.


Edited by Scorpiany, Apr 11 2019 - 01:51.


fsdgsg #8 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 01:55

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Found this more useful than Wg's youtube guide lol. +1

Guido1212 #9 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 01:59

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Great stuff scorp.

Kramah313 #10 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 02:05

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Thank you! I recently got a IS-3 but am still having trouble getting the angles right for reverse sidescraping. I appreciate the help from the guide. I have gotten used to sidescraping, but reverse is still tricky for me. 

LeaveIT2Beaver #11 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 02:17

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Awesome!  Now for that T26E4 guide....

the_Deadly_Bulb #12 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 02:46

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:honoring: +1

 



tod914 #13 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 02:51

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Fantastic guide Scorp.  As always.  :great:  Learned a few things that should help me get through my remaining block mission.  Thanks.

Edited by tod914, Apr 11 2019 - 02:52.


saru_richard #14 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 03:06

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please don't shoot my Kravs turret top ;_;

I_QQ_4_U #15 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 07:08

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You have inspired me to do my own armour usage article.

 



Scorpiany #16 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 07:34

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View PostI_QQ_4_U, on Apr 11 2019 - 00:08, said:

You have inspired me to do my own armour usage article.

 

 

Amazing, 10/10, now I can finally swat those pesky scorpions on the battlefield. :great:

Guido1212 #17 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 17:29

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View PostI_QQ_4_U, on Apr 11 2019 - 06:08, said:

You have inspired me to do my own armour usage article.

 

No no no.  Barrel is OP armor.  That’s where I always seem to hit.



I_QQ_4_U #18 Posted Apr 11 2019 - 17:48

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View PostGuido1212, on Apr 11 2019 - 17:29, said:

No no no.  Barrel is OP armor.  That’s where I always seem to hit.

 

Well if you know you're going to shoot one you should be firing HE, which will do damage even if it hits the barrel, might need to add an addendum.

Akrotiri #19 Posted Apr 12 2019 - 00:03

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This is very helpful, thank you.

F1O1 #20 Posted Apr 13 2019 - 02:00

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View PostScorpiany, on Apr 11 2019 - 00:50, said:

 

Spaced armor will prevent HE from penetrating, but a common misconception is that it helps tanks take less damage from HE. The problem is, as I demonstrated with the Super Conqueror, the spaced armor sheilds give the shell a place to detonate where it can then proceed to splash over the roof armor of the tank itself.

 

Caern AX vs. the regular Caern, or the Cheiftain vs. the Super Conqueror demonstrates this fairly well. While all of those tanks will still take substantial HE damage, the Caern AX and the Super Conqueror will consistently take more HE damage, and receive more hits that do larger amounts than the regular Caern and Cheiftain which don't have that spaced armor shield.

 

Where spaced armor really shines is against HEAT shells, since it will often stop them from penetrating completely. But spaced armor against HE just provides it with a landing platform to splash the hull roof. There are exceptions of course, such as if you're playing the Wolverine and getting shot by M4 Sherman derps which otherwise might have penned - But at the higher Tiers, or for any non-penetrating HE shell, spaced armor usually doesn't help in preventing the armor from getting penetrated, so it only makes the tank more vulnerable versus HE.

 

Typically, HE resistant tanks are Soviet/Chinese tanks, Japanese heavy tanks, and if shot improperly  -  German heavy tanks or things like Jag panzer / obj 263. Badger and T110E3 take HE well too, at least E3 from the front.  l can see what you are trying to say, but largely it is for another reason, l will explain later. But, spaced armour panels like on lS3, lS7, T-44-100, 50TP proto, 60TP, E100  -  where large screens protect the running gear and side armour, or upper sides. There is absolutely no disadvantage, because the side armour sheaths most, if not the entire component, and prevents line-of-sight of the explosions radius to actual hull portions.  ln addition, tanks like Skoda T50, Sheridan, are virtually saved by their spaced armour panels, which will block HE attacks that would otherwise rape hull armour, listed 38 or 40mm. Other case examples, like Super pershing, panther M10, thunderbolt - have spaced armour stapled onto their front hull, which basically adds, protecting the front hull more while any roof sections are unavailable from the line-of-sight effects of an explosion. l can understand Caernarvon AX, super conqueror, super pershing turret, thunderbolt turret, WZ132-1 turret, where turret ear shaped spaced armour panels detonate HE and then it may move downward with clear line-of-sight, into the vehicle hull roof. Like a Type 5 shooting Maus in the turret and splashing the engine body and roof of platform. But as l said, this is another reason altogether. 

 

Go into tanks gg, and take a tank like Caernarvon, T-34 heavy, Lowe, or Emil l.  Go into collision model, view the tank 90 deg vertical, so you see the tank as a flagpole, directly above it. You will clearly see, beneath the turret and above the upper hull, the forward hull roof.  Green in most cases, 20-40mm armour in most cases. So HE hits the turret, and splashes that. There is the problem.  Now, still in tanks gg,  take a Soviet, Chinese, Polish example instead. With their compact, angular hulls,  using the same view,  these green areas are shrouded, covered, and small. Rather than a landing strip for HE splash.  Take a good look, lS6 or 110 for example, there are no green at all. All yellow zones.  But it does not stop there, lS3, lS3A, WZ111, 112, lS5, 252, 53TP, 50 TP - all these tanks have extremely small portions, narrow gaps of green zones.  Comapred to the massive landing strips other nations get.  Lowe or T26E5, despite their good turret armour, still show HE landing strips to splash, only 40 or 41mm thick. Thats why soviet design reduces this, simply because their forward hull roof are radically smaller. Even a tank like AMX65T, take it into tanks gg, look at it vertically. Small upper roof surface area. lS-M, 705s are different, resembling more things like chrysler or VK4502B. HE tends to splash them harder. 

 

Obviously, tanks like Maus, 263, VK4502B, VK7201, E100 - if you shoot them improperly, like right into the hull front with HE, where it can't splash anything thin, no line-of sight angles, than you get a 0 dmg HE splash. 

 

Japanese tanks are just HE resistant by the nature of thickness. The high tier mammoths, all have like roof 75-90mm. Cuts down on HE that way.

 






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