Jump to content


911

A day Americs awoke.

  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

bockscar43 #1 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 08:28

    Captain

  • -Players-
  • 31989 battles
  • 1,633
  • [PL1AR] PL1AR
  • Member since:
    01-01-2015
America on that blue sky day was suddenly turned into blackned sky with the collapse of the Twin Towers. Let us pause and reflect how our lives changed...Peace.

_Tsavo_ #2 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 08:46

    Major

  • Beta Testers
  • 45840 battles
  • 19,503
  • [BRVE] BRVE
  • Member since:
    02-16-2011

I was in social studies class at a charter school 8th grade.  Our teacher dragged the TV in and hooked it up, saying how some accident at the trade nerve center could impact the stock market, etc.  A good lesson on how events impact society. (boy was he right) It was a change of pace and while it was tragic to see a plane crash, it beat whatever we were going to do that class. 

 

Then the second one happened.  

 

Then the plane went down in PA, about 30 minutes from the charter school.  That was enough and we were sent home early. 

 

I lived near an airport and had spent the prior summer riding bikes around the lots, hanging out with ground crew, and a few tours of the control tower.  Even front of the front row seats for the airshows. 

 

Yeah, that all ended.  While the world still turns, my personal history is before and after the 11th of September.  There's now kids graduating high school who only ever knew the post world.  They don't have that polarizing event, no security theater, no metal detectors at sporting events, no overpatriotic shenanigans, none of that was prior.  We were more innocent as a public.

 

Those airshows never happened again while I was near.  Fences went up, gates were closed, the terminal was redone, armed guards for the first few years, even biking in the parking lot was off limits.   Those air shows took ten years to return.  

 

 

 

 

Edit: what really sticks out in my memory is how quiet things were and how clear the skies were.  There was always a contrail or three or some turboprop spooling up for takeoff but following that day it was the silence that stuck out. 


Edited by _Tsavo_, Sep 11 2019 - 09:18.


venom286 #3 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 09:38

    Captain

  • Players
  • 42820 battles
  • 1,215
  • Member since:
    11-08-2012
i was at work and saw it on the news when it happen 

Baron_Von_Krieg #4 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 11:36

    First lieutenant

  • Players
  • 24846 battles
  • 995
  • [ARIET] ARIET
  • Member since:
    11-04-2013
I was at work and a co-worker said ' Dude , we're getting bombed ' . 

1_Eyed_Mule #5 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 13:36

    Corporal

  • Players
  • 13339 battles
  • 95
  • [BHA] BHA
  • Member since:
    02-11-2013
   I was a Deputy working a small County Fair at the time.  I remember people hearing about it, some falling down crying, others just standing in shock and asking how and why.  Next thing I was told to load up and go sit at the local airport and not let any planes take off.  I sat there for 2 days, they brought me box lunches and I took a spit baths in the local restroom.  Longest 2 days I had for a long time before and after.  Still see some of the old people who cry on this date.  It is still with the ones who know what it did to us, hope the young that came after never have it happen.

CallandorsFire #6 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 13:42

    Captain

  • Players
  • 44286 battles
  • 1,563
  • [SEELS] SEELS
  • Member since:
    04-22-2012
I was in midtown Manhattan and looked south and saw the smoke rising from the towers.  I thought to myself, how could a commercial airplane crash into the World Trade Center?  When the second one hit, I said that's no coincidence.  All mass transit was shut down, and I had to walk across the 59th St bridge into Queens to get home, and I wondered, what just happened today?  I lost two friends in the towers that day.

Edited by CallandorsFire, Sep 11 2019 - 13:43.


Cpl_DevilDog #7 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 13:42

    Sergeant

  • Players
  • 4178 battles
  • 119
  • Member since:
    01-22-2014
I was at Camp LeJeune.  You can guess what went on there.

CanadianPuppy #8 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 13:44

    Sergeant

  • -Players-
  • 414 battles
  • 106
  • Member since:
    06-22-2019
And in some cases, not for the better.

Rude_Elf #9 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 13:50

    Sergeant

  • Players
  • 2063 battles
  • 175
  • Member since:
    04-26-2013
   Was at work,  saw it on the tv when some one called us all to the lunch room.  Most of us just sat there and wondered how and why.  Later most of us got madder then H_LL and wanted the A holes found and punished for it.  Never forget....  Tsavo remembers the plane that the passengers made a hard choice to save others, and many others that day who gave all with out thinking about themselves.  Been to the crash site in Penn many times since it opened, just makes one wonder how they could do that... Never Forget!!! 

Dr_Jerkov #10 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 14:33

    Sergeant

  • -Players-
  • 1275 battles
  • 109
  • [-RH-] -RH-
  • Member since:
    10-10-2018
I remember I was in first grade and we all turned on the radio and sat on the ground all huddling around it listening to the report. I still remember clearly sitting on that blue carpet being scared my school (in Nebraska keep in mind) was going to blow up next.

GeorgePreddy #11 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 14:47

    Major

  • Players
  • 14680 battles
  • 13,325
  • Member since:
    04-11-2013

My wife and i both worked for Midway Airlines at the time, based at RDU (Raleigh-Durham, NC).

 

Neither of us having any flight duty that day, we were sleeping in. The phone rang. It was her father, calling from Brasil to check and see if we were OK because he said he saw on the TV that a plane had hit The World Trade Center in New York.

 

I told my wife, "Probably an amateur pilot in a light plane, lost in low clouds, meandered into a building... I'll turn on the TV".

 

We had a 61" giant box of a TV in the bedroom, got it on just in time to see the second plane hit. I said "A lot of people are dying today, we only lost our jobs, we're so lucky".

 

It was true, even more died that day, in PA and D.C.

 

And our little 737 airline shut down operations immediately. Eight hundred pilots, fourteen hundred flight attendants, and all other Midway employees, several thousand people, were terminated instantly.

 

A few months later, being a very senior captain, I was called to go to Arizona with 11 other very senior Midway Captains to return 6 of our 737-700 airplanes from their desert storage to RDU. We re-started the airline using Government emergency funds for airlines deeply affected by the 9/11 mass murders. Midway tried, but in the really bad airline travel atmosphere of the aftermath time period, it just couldn't make it, and closed for good fairly quickly.

 

On the brighter side... I never would have been looking for a job, and consequently gotten hired to train for a captain job flying the 747 if Midway had not failed... so, silver lining for me at least.

 

This anniversary is particularly sad for all airline people in the world. Monsters used our beautiful and useful jet airliners for murder weapons that day, thousands of people were murdered, and many of them were our brother and sister crew members who set out that morning to provide several hundred passengers with very safe and comfortable transportation, home to their loved ones, or off to job interviews, vacations, or other adventures.

 

God save us all from the monsters of this world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



GynxCrazy #12 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 15:30

    Staff sergeant

  • Players
  • 8874 battles
  • 295
  • [NXGEN] NXGEN
  • Member since:
    09-18-2013

I was in a cradle in my mom and dads room. To be so innocent and not be there (mentally, atleast) i guess is a blessing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


BE_Schultz #13 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 15:38

    Corporal

  • Players
  • 24614 battles
  • 36
  • [BE] BE
  • Member since:
    09-10-2011
https://www.youtube....h?v=k-BNO1jNnFY

DVK9 #14 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 16:15

    First lieutenant

  • Players
  • 26027 battles
  • 899
  • [-TX-] -TX-
  • Member since:
    05-15-2013

I had been out of the military for awhile.

I was in Alaska and a friend called me, after getting off work at 2 am to tell me to turn the tv on.

Usually we are 5 hours behind EST but with the live I watch the second hit. I sat and watched most of the day.

Then I went down to the recruiting office and asked the cutoff date to reenlist. I missed by 2 years.

Its been 18 years now and this was our generations Pearl Harbor.

I pray the next few generations never have to have this happen to wake up.



HOTA_CHATON #15 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 16:15

    Major

  • Players
  • 13413 battles
  • 14,321
  • Member since:
    09-28-2011

View Postbockscar43, on Sep 11 2019 - 01:28, said:

America on that blue sky day was suddenly turned into blackned sky with the collapse of the Twin Towers. Let us pause and reflect how our lives changed...Peace.


Yes, but, how quickly Americans have forgotten just for a free government hand out.  Instead of keeping a vigilant watch, most Americans are asleep at the wheel, hence the current political landscape that we now have.



Devil__Anse #16 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 16:26

    First lieutenant

  • Players
  • 1810 battles
  • 748
  • [HSOLO] HSOLO
  • Member since:
    05-05-2013
I was at the firehouse getting ready to go off duty when I saw the second plane hit.  Knew right then and there that the world would never be the same.  Also thought at the time we would lose 1000 firefighters that day.  I sat in abject horror watching the FD operations knowing that those guys were going in to an actual hell.  RIP 343 FDNY

MountainLion1 #17 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 16:43

    Captain

  • -Players-
  • 24841 battles
  • 1,905
  • Member since:
    10-13-2014
I was at college on that day and our campus opened up an auditorium where everyone could gather to watch the attack. I got to the auditorium just in time to see the plane hit the second tower. At that time no one really knew what was going on for sure. As the reports came in it was apparent that this was a deliberate attack and that the America we knew was gone for ever. 

rockbutcher #18 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 16:44

    Captain

  • -Players-
  • 22381 battles
  • 1,054
  • [-OPS-] -OPS-
  • Member since:
    03-06-2015
I was working at a mine in northern Ontario, in a small town that served as the jumping off point for American (some CDN) fishermen tourists to fly north to the fishing camps.  It happened on the day that the camps were to be cycled, with the new guys going in and those who had been there for a week coming out.  ALL of the bushplanes were grounded for a few days.  The one and only bar in town was packed with stuck tourists.  No music, only CNN on all the screens and you could cut the silent anger in the air with a knife.

Klaatu_Nicto #19 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 16:52

    Major

  • Players
  • 44044 battles
  • 10,567
  • Member since:
    09-21-2012

View Post_Tsavo_, on Sep 10 2019 - 23:46, said:

I was in social studies class at a charter school 8th grade.  Our teacher dragged the TV in and hooked it up, saying how some accident at the trade nerve center could impact the stock market, etc.  A good lesson on how events impact society. (boy was he right) It was a change of pace and while it was tragic to see a plane crash, it beat whatever we were going to do that class. 

 

Then the second one happened.  

 

Then the plane went down in PA, about 30 minutes from the charter school.  That was enough and we were sent home early. 

 

I lived near an airport and had spent the prior summer riding bikes around the lots, hanging out with ground crew, and a few tours of the control tower.  Even front of the front row seats for the airshows. 

 

Yeah, that all ended.  While the world still turns, my personal history is before and after the 11th of September.  There's now kids graduating high school who only ever knew the post world.  They don't have that polarizing event, no security theater, no metal detectors at sporting events, no overpatriotic shenanigans, none of that was prior.  We were more innocent as a public.

 

Those airshows never happened again while I was near.  Fences went up, gates were closed, the terminal was redone, armed guards for the first few years, even biking in the parking lot was off limits.   Those air shows took ten years to return.  

 

 

 

 

Edit: what really sticks out in my memory is how quiet things were and how clear the skies were.  There was always a contrail or three or some turboprop spooling up for takeoff but following that day it was the silence that stuck out. 

 

I've lived near Seatac and Boeing field, along with several small airports, most of my life so that's what sticks in my mind too.

 

 



nuclearguy931 #20 Posted Sep 11 2019 - 16:54

    Major

  • Players
  • 81670 battles
  • 10,852
  • [UMM] UMM
  • Member since:
    08-16-2011

I was awake, eating breakfast and a friend called to tell me to turn the TV on, I had no idea what had happened, as I turned on the TV the 2nd plane went into the building. My then 3 year old son come out and said 'airplane movie', neither my wife or I knew at that time how to explain to him what was going on.

 

Being a manager in the railroad industry all of our rail operations were suspended immediately. Our yard was about 2 miles away from Toronto Pearson International and not seeing any air traffic for the next few days was quite an eerie feeling. Underground transit in Toronto was halted, all tall buildings were evacuated and tens of thousands were sent home with no idea what was going to happen next. It was quite the frantic experience even for us being so far removed from where the tragedy was unfolding.

 

This is one of those times when you know exactly what it was you were doing when it happened. My thoughts and prayers are still with all of those poor souls that were lost and the families of all who were impacted on that very tragic day.






19 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 19 guests, 0 anonymous users